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I have developed a PowerShell function that performs a number of actions involving provisioing SharePoint Team sites. Ultimatley I want the function to return the URL of the provisioned site as a string so at the end of my function i have the following code:

$rs = $url.ToString();
return $rs;

The code that calls this function looks like:

$returnURL = MyFunction -param 1 ...

So I am expecting a string however I don't. Instead it is an object of type System.Management.Automation.PSMethod. Why is that? Why is it returning this instead of the specified string?

Thanks

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1  
Can we see the function declaration? –  zdan Apr 23 '12 at 19:17
    
No, not the function invocation, show us how/where you declared "MyFunction". What happens when you do: Get-Item function:\MyFunction –  zdan Apr 23 '12 at 21:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 53 down vote accepted

PowerShell has really wacky return semantics - at least when viewed from a more traditional programming perspective. There are two main ideas to wrap your head around:

  • All output is captured, and returned
  • The return keyword really just indicates a logical exit point

Thus, the following two script blocks will do effectively the exact same thing:

$a = "Hello, World"
return $a

 

$a = "Hello, World"
$a
return

The $a variable in the second example is left as output on the pipeline and, as mentioned, all output is returned. In fact, in the second example you could omit the return entirely and you would get the same behavior (the return would be implied as the function naturally completes and exits).

Without more of your function definition I can't say why you are getting a PSMethod object. My guess is that you probably have something a few lines up that is not being captured and is being placed on the output pipeline.

It is also worth noting that you probably don't need those semicolons - unless you are nesting multiple expressions on a single line.

You can read more about the return semantics on the about_Return page on TechNet, or by invoking the help return command from PowerShell itself.

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so is there any way to return a scaler value from a function? –  ChiliYago Apr 23 '12 at 22:04
    
I am not entirely sure what you mean by scalar value. For example, the following code returns a scalar value: function Return-One { 1 } - you could do similar things with any "scalar" values: strings, numbers, booleans, etc... –  Goyuix Apr 23 '12 at 22:11
    
If your function returns a hashtable, then it will treat the result as such, but if you "echo" anything within the function body, including the output of other commands, and suddenly the result is mixed. –  Luke Puplett Jan 28 '13 at 23:01
1  
If you want to output stuff to the screen from within a function without returning that text as part of the function result, use the command write-debug after setting the variable $DebugPreference = "Continue" instead of "SilentlyContinue" –  BeowulfNode42 Nov 5 at 3:55

I have too much to say in a comment so here goes.

This part of PowerShell is probably the most stupid aspect. Any extraneous output generated during a function will pollute the result, sometimes there's no output and then under some conditions there is some other unplanned output, in addition to your planned return value.

So, what I do is remove the assignment from the original function call so the output ends up on screen, and then step through until something I didn't plan for pops out in the debugger window (using the PS ISE).

Even things like reserving variables in outer scopes cause output, like [boolean]$isEnabled; which will annoyingly spit a False out unless you make it [boolean]$isEnabled = $false;

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1  
Why would you just reserve a name instead of doing the best practice of properly initializing the variable with a value explicitly defined. –  BeowulfNode42 Oct 30 at 3:49
    
It was just an example of an operation that generates unexpected output. But personally, I'm a C# developer, so its just habitual. –  Luke Puplett Oct 30 at 8:41
1  
I take it you mean that you have a block of variable declarations at the start of each scope for every variable used in that scope. You should still, or may already, be initializing all variables before using them in any language including C#. Also importantly doing [boolean]$a in powershell does not actually declare the variable $a. You can confirm this by following that line with the line $a.gettype() and compare that output to when you declare and initialize with the string $a = [boolean]$false. –  BeowulfNode42 Nov 5 at 3:47
    
In C#, value types are initialized to their default values, a boolean being false. It's normal to write bool isEnabled; but you need to assign a value before reading, the compiler will warn you. For class fields, this is not necessary, you can read without assigning a value. –  Luke Puplett Nov 6 at 5:34
    
Regarding, PS not actually assigning/allocating a variable, that is well worth noting! Another difference to C# that's caught me out. I tend to get in trouble with dynamic languages. –  Luke Puplett Nov 6 at 5:47

It's hard to say without looking at at code. Make sure your function doesn't return more than one object and that you capture any results made from other calls. What do you get for:

@($returnURL).count

Anyway, two suggestions:

Cast the object to string:

...
return [string]$rs

Or just enclose it in double quotes, same as above but shorter to type:

...
return "$rs"
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1  
Or even just "$rs" - the return is only required when returning early from the function. Leaving out the return is better PowerShell idiom. –  David Clarke Jul 29 '13 at 22:19

As a workaround I've been returning the last object in the array that you get back from the function... not a great solution but it's better than nothing:

someFunction {
   $a = "hello"
   "Function is running"
   return $a
}

$b = someFunction
$b = $b[($b.count - 1)]
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$b = $b[-1] would be a simpler way of getting the last element or the array, but even simpler would be to just not output values you don't want. –  Duncan Nov 28 at 18:53

The following simply returns 4 as an answer. When you replace the add expressions for strings it returns the first string.

Function StartingMain {
  $a = 1 + 3
  $b = 2 + 5
  $c = 3 + 7
  Return $a
}
Function StartingEnd($b) {
  Write-Host $b
}
StartingEnd(StartingMain)

This can also be done for an array. The example below will return "Text 2"

Function StartingMain {
  $a = ,@("Text 1","Text 2","Text 3")
  Return $a
}
Function StartingEnd($b) {
  Write-Host $b[1]
}
StartingEnd(StartingMain)

Note that you have to call the function below the function itself otherwise the first time it runs it will return an error that it doesn't know what "StartingMain" is.

I do hope it helps.

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Luke's description of the function results in these scenarios seems to be right on. Only wish to understand the root cause and the PowerShell product team would do something about the behavior, seems to be quite common and has cost be too much debugging time.

To get around this issue I've been using Global variables rather than returning and using the value from the Function call.

Here's another thread on the use of Global variables: powershell setting a global variable from a function where the global variable name is a variable passed to the function

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