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I'm having some issues getting a proper boolean return on section 4.1 of Codecademy's Javascript tutorial. Here is the code:

// Define quarter here.
var quarter = function(n) {
    if (n / 4 ){
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
};

if (quarter(4) === 1) {
  console.log("The statement is true.");
} else {
  console.log("The statement is false.");
}

From what I can see, I am passing the newly defined quarter varaiable a function with a parameter of 'n' that I then divide by 4 to see if it returns 1 for true, or 0 (else) for false. I then am using the 'quarter' function in an if loop to check for equality of 1 of the number '4' passed as 'n'.

I'm assuming this is some basic logic that I am just not used to using (as a front end developer looking to get into Javascript programming) but I would definitely appreciate some thoughts and guidance.

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In JavaScript, the constants true and false are not numbers; they're a separate type.

Furthermore, you're comparing with === and that will explicitly prevent type conversion during the comparison.

Note that n / 4 is going to be true (non-zero) for all values of "n" except 0 (edit you probably meant to use %). And in general, any construction of the form:

if (expression) {
  return true;
}
else {
  return false;
}

can be replaced by:

return !!(expression);

or, alternatively,

return Boolean(expression);
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1  
+1 for pointing out logic error. –  Dave Newton Apr 23 '12 at 19:07
    
return !!(expression); is pretty horrible shortcut to boolean conversion but still - nice answer –  Paul Sullivan Apr 23 '12 at 19:11
    
Well it's not really "horrible"; it's just idiomatic. But chacun son goût :-) –  Pointy Apr 23 '12 at 20:30

Change your if statement to be consistent, since 1 != true. The triple equals will not allow it.

if (quarter(4) == true) {

Your function is also incorrect, I think you want something more like this, to return if it's divisible by 4:

var quarter = function(n) {
  if (n % 4 == 0){
    return true;
  } else {
    return false;
  }
};

This can be shortened to this:

var quarter = function(n) {
   return n % 4 == 0;
}
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2  
Er... really? For the purposes of the question, this code is equivalent. –  Dave Newton Apr 23 '12 at 18:52
    
Yes this code is equivalent - the % symbol will return 0 OR NOT 0. All positive integers will be interpreted as TRUE and 0 is false. So it is equivalent –  Paul Sullivan Apr 23 '12 at 19:06
1  
Oh, that's great. That shorthand definitely makes more sense. Thanks! –  Matt Zelenak Apr 23 '12 at 19:41

Using === means you're asking for a "strict equals"--not truthy or falsey. This means you can't check for a number, because a number is not strictly true. See this SO question for more details.

The calling code should either check for === true, or just skip the explicit value compare, and just be if (quarter(4)) { ....

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