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AFAIK in C++ (or at least in my compilers: gcc and clang) the following code is allowed:

struct BLA { void *operator new( std::size_t size, int i1, int i2 ); };

int main( void )
{
    struct BLA *bla = new (3,5) BLA;
    return 0;
}

IMAO this is quite cool since it allows a very clean syntax of allocating storage.
With this technique I can pass variables that attribute the way an object should be allocated in a very clean way and wouldn't have to abuse the constructor.
Unfortunately the C++ standard says (AFAIK) that the analogous way will not work for the 'delete' operator. i.e:

struct BLA
{
    void *operator new( std::size_t size, int i1, int i2 );
    void operator delete( void *p, int i1, int i2 );
};

int main( void )
{
    struct BLA *bla = new (3,5) BLA;
    delete (3,5) bla;
    return 0;
}

gives a hard error on the 'delete' line.
Is there a way (maybe a compiler switch) to allow this nonstandard implicit call to
BLA::operator delete( bla, 3, 5 )?

Using the above line would REALLY destroy the nice syntax :(

share|improve this question
    
"maybe a compiler switch" - when asking for non-standard things it's worth mentioning which compiler you're using. Personally though I don't think something like it that is going to be worth the pain! – Flexo Apr 23 '12 at 18:57
    
As stated at the top I am using gcc and clang. Though personally I wouldn't see a pain in passing a switch ;) – iolo Apr 23 '12 at 18:58
1  
Sorry, I could've sworn that wasn't there when I looked. The pain isn't in passing the switch, it's when you're committed to it (large code base) and then suddenly you have to switch to another compiler and re-write everything. The win isn't big (it's nothing you can't do with constructor/destructor and possibly some template trickery depending on your motivations). You're mixing concerns (allocating memory vs. initialising memory) which are deliberately different things. – Flexo Apr 23 '12 at 19:02
1  
Can you explain what this does that BLA *bla = new BLA(3, 5); doesn't do? – Mark B Apr 23 '12 at 19:03
    
@awoodland Yeah. I can agree on that. I just liked the syntax ;). Well. Basically your expression would call the constructor of BLA with arguments (3,5) while my version would simply call the default constructor after having called operator new with arguments (3,5). Its just two different things. What I'd like to do is something like delete (DEEP) bla, or delete (SHALLOW) bla. That would be cool imho. – iolo Apr 23 '12 at 19:09
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no way to pass arguments to the delete operator. Seen Bjarne's reasoning for this here. An overloaded delete such as the one you are implementing is only used when called explicetly or when the corresponding new throws.

If you need to make sure that the correct delete is called, there is a trick you can use though. If you only have two 32 bit ints that are passed to the constructor, just reserve 64 bit more than needed and put these two parameters in front of the object (you just need to return the offsetted position before returning the pointer). When you delete your object, do not pass any parameters, but instead fetch them from in front of the object and use them to deallocate correctly. This way you can use delete without parameters, and you can be sure that each object is deallocated correctly.

Not sure if the following would be considered a bug in your system:

struct BLA *bla = new (3,5) BLA;
delete (4,6) bla;

I.e. if it is possible to deallocate differently than allocating, this method will not work. If it is dangerous to deallocate differently, than this way with explicetly saving the parameters is actually much safer.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is not that I find no way to do it with - there are plenty. I was just thinking: "Hey, I want to use that syntax". But if you say its not possible I believe you. I didn't have much hope on this anyway ;) – iolo Apr 23 '12 at 19:12
    
+1, allocating some extra memory before or after is the way to go if you really must do something like thsi – Flexo Apr 23 '12 at 19:13
    
Just remember that when allocating extra memory you need to be careful about not breaking alignment constraints on larger types. – Mark B Apr 23 '12 at 20:14

Stroustrup mentions something that's probably helpful in discussing the lack of 'placement delete' in C++.

Rather than customizing delete, you can write your own destruction function.

struct BLA {
  void *operator new( std::size_t size, int i1, int i2 );
  void destroy( int i1, int i2 );
private:
  ~BLA(); // private so you can't call regular delete
};

void BLA::destroy( int i1, int i2 ) {
  this->~BLA(); // explicit destructor call
  // your custom deallocation code
}

FWIW - having to pass in parameters to delete that match what you passed in to new seems like a very dangerous thing to do. I recommend allocating a little extra space so you can store i1 and i2 in it. Then your destroy function shouldn't need any parameters at all.

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