Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It seems the 'dir' command when used with /b option (bare format) doesn't recognize the /l (lowercase) option. I'm trying to get the extension of files in a directory but I'm unable to strip the case, rendering the following code useless for all files with capitalized characters in their extensions.

for /f "delims=" %%a in ('dir /l /b/a-d /s') do (
if "%%~xa"==".iso" echo %%~xa
if "%%~xa"==".bin" echo %%~xa
)

Is there a workaround for this?

share|improve this question
    
Works for me on Win 7. –  Joey Apr 23 '12 at 19:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

dir /l certainly works for me, even in the combination of switches you gave there. But even if it didn't, there are two simple things:

  1. Don't use for /f to iterate over dir output. It's error-prone and mangles Unicode characters unless you set your console options correctly. Use

    for /r %%a in (*) do ...
    

    instead, which will iterate over files recursively as well.

  2. Use /I as an option to if:

    if /i "%%~xa" EQU ".iso" ...
    

And finally, why not take the easy route:

for /r %%a in (*.iso *.bin) do ...

This works regardless of case:

H:.
│   x
│
├───a
│       xyz.bin
│       xyz.ISO
│
└───b
        abc.BIN
        abc.iso

H:\Stuff>for /r %x in (*.iso *.bin) do @echo %x
H:\Stuff\a\xyz.ISO
H:\Stuff\a\xyz.bin
H:\Stuff\b\abc.iso
H:\Stuff\b\abc.BIN
share|improve this answer

You could make a toUpper function and call it on the %%~xa, then compare to .ISO or .BIN. Here's a reference.

share|improve this answer

Modern Windows has powershell. A one-liner in PS would be: ls * -recurse -include *.iso,*.bin, which would ignore the case of the filenames. (ls is an alias for dir) [see comment by Joey]

share|improve this answer
    
You missed -Recurse. And ls is an alias for Get-ChildItem (as is dir). –  Joey Apr 23 '12 at 19:14
    
@Joey: thanks, added the parameter. the comment about ls being an alias to dir was an attempt to keep the terminology in the batch world for the OP. Didn't want to start naming too many unfamilliar things for smeone coming from batch. –  Dan-o Apr 23 '12 at 19:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.