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I have a large file containing data like this:

a 23
b 8
a 22
b 1

I want to be able to get this:

a 45
b 9

I can first sort this file and then do it in Python by scanning the file once. What is a good direct command-line way of doing this?

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1  
Note that the 'a's only add up to 45, not 55. –  Mark Reed Apr 23 '12 at 19:17

5 Answers 5

awk '{
    arr[$1]+=$2
   }
   END {
     for (key in arr) printf("%s\t%s\n", key, arr[key])
   }' file \
   | sort +0n -1

can't test right now, back in a few mins.

I hope this helps.

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what exactly do those arguments do to sort? I don't see them in the man page and the invocation page has left me confused. –  EricR Apr 23 '12 at 19:11
    
Modern versions of sort prefer the -k syntax for specifying sort keys: sort -nk1,1 instead of sort +0n -1. But since the keys are letters, why are you specifying -n anyway? –  Mark Reed Apr 23 '12 at 19:11
    
@EricR: +0n -1 is old-fashioned for -n -k1,1: sort numerically by the first (whitespace-separated) field. –  Mark Reed Apr 23 '12 at 19:12
    
Okay. that's a little clearer. Cheers. –  EricR Apr 23 '12 at 19:13
    
You could also let awk do the sorting: asorti(arr,keys); for (i in keys) { printf "%s\t%s\n", keys[i], arr[keys[i]]); –  Mark Reed Apr 23 '12 at 19:14

No need for awk here, or even sort -- if you have Bash 4.0, you can use associative arrays:

#!/bin/bash
declare -A values
while read key value; do
  values["$key"]=$(( $value + ${values[$key]:-0} ))
done
for key in "${!values[@]}"; do
  printf "%s %s\n" "$key" "${values[$key]}"
done

...or, if you sort the file first (which will be more memory-efficient; GNU sort is able to do tricks to sort files larger than memory, which a naive script -- whether in awk, python or shell -- typically won't), you can do this in a way which will work in older versions (I expect the following to work through bash 2.0):

#!/bin/bash
read cur_key cur_value
while read key value; do
  if [[ $key = "$cur_key" ]] ; then
    cur_value=$(( cur_value + value ))
  else
    printf "%s %s\n" "$cur_key" "$cur_value"
    cur_key="$key"
    cur_value="$value"
  fi
done
printf "%s %s\n" "$cur_key" "$cur_value"
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3  
Heck, with some minimal munging the above would work in vanilla Bourne, no bash required.while read key value; do if [ "$key" = "$cur_key" ]; then cur_value=`expr $cur_value + $value`; else echo "$cur_key $cur_value"; cur_key="$key"; cur_value="$value"; fi; done; echo "$cur_key $cur_value" –  Mark Reed Apr 23 '12 at 19:26

This Perl one-liner seems to do the job:

perl -nle '($k, $v) = split; $s{$k} += $v; END {$, = " "; foreach $k (sort keys %s) {print $k, $s{$k}}}' inputfile
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One way using perl:

perl -ane '
    next unless @F == 2; 
    $h{ $F[0] } += $F[1]; 
    END { 
        printf qq[%s %d\n], $_, $h{ $_ } for sort keys %h;
    }
' infile

Content of infile:

a 23
b 8
a 22
b 1

Output:

a 45
b 9
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With GNU awk (versions less than 4):

WHINY_USERS= awk 'END {
  for (E in a)
    print E, a[E]
    }
{ a[$1] += $2 }' infile

With GNU awk >= 4:

awk 'END {
  PROCINFO["sorted_in"] = "@ind_str_asc"
  for (E in a)
    print E, a[E]
    }
{ a[$1] += $2 }' infile
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