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Is it possible to make applications for iPhone using Adobe Flex/AIR? Any tutorials, pointers?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

No, I don't believe you can. Although support for Flash on the iPhone has been rumored for a while now, it continues to fail to materialize.

ETA: It appears that this is now possible

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Also here: wired.com/gadgetlab/2008/11/adobe-flash-on It doesn't look like it's going to happen anytime soon, mainly because Apple doesn't seem interested in allowing it. However I think once Android starts making inroads with consumers, provided it supports Flash (which looks likely), Apple will probably buckle. –  Christian Nunciato Jun 22 '09 at 20:17
    
I don't think so. The iPhone has such incredible mindshare right now that I doubt mainstream consumers know the Android exists. –  Nosredna Jun 22 '09 at 21:02
    
Right now, sure. But in time competition will creep in. Always does. –  Christian Nunciato Jun 22 '09 at 22:34
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I think that it's far more likely that HTML 5 will take the place of Flash on Apple's platforms for many of the things that Flash does. Apple has been pushing HTML 5 hard in Safari 4 and the latest Mobile Safari. –  Brad Larson Jun 22 '09 at 22:41

As of October 5, Flash is actually supported on IPhones! Have a look at this site.

Edit: A mobile version of the flex framework has been announced by Adobe for sometime next year.

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+1 But it's worth noting that this is for Flash CS5 and not necessarily Flex/FlashBuilder (and by extension, the commandline compiler) –  Richard Szalay Oct 8 '09 at 7:24
    
Yes, that's right. Fortunately a special version of the flex framework for mobiles is going to follow sometime next year: labs.adobe.com/technologies/flex/mobile –  Adrian Grigore Dec 29 '09 at 17:06

The iPhone SDK says:

3.3.2 An Application may not itself install or launch other executable code by any means, including without limitation through the use of a plug-in architecture, calling other frameworks, other APIs or otherwise. No interpreted code may be downloaded and used in an Application except for code that is interpreted and run by Apple’s Published APIs and built-in interpreter(s).

Flex and Flash programs are interpreted (or JIT'd). PSP, Nokia N8x0 and other Nokia Symbian devices have flash player working in decent speed, so I doubt it's the hardware that's restricting it.

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The iPhone SDK doesn't matter. All that matters is negotiations between Apple and Adobe. –  Nosredna Jun 22 '09 at 21:03
    
Interpreted code is fine, actually. An application that can run arbitrary code is the deal breaker for Apple. Sega has some iPhone games that run on emulators, but they are locked so that only one game can be run for a single "app". If Adobe can find a way to lock the runtime to a single SWF, and allow that to be distributed in one package, then it will be possible to build Flash-based apps for iPhone. –  joshtynjala Jun 23 '09 at 20:13

They are going to release a "lite" Flex-Mobile SDK. Currently the alpha of Flash CS5 will only compile Flash to the iPhone, but there are more plans for the release.

There are several apps currently in the store that were developed completely in Flash.

So, unless you are in the Pre-Release, right now, no. Soon you will be able to though.

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The answer is NO

Flex applications are Flash apps.. and the iPhone does not support the Flash Player.

The first phone supporting flash will be HTC Hero. For more details about new phones that will support flash player you can google for Open Screen Project.

UPDATE:

You can now publish AIR to iPad or iPhone using Flex/Flash and AS3.


Adrian

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