Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If a database has tables that contain the same FK, should they be normalized?

These are the db tables in question:

user (
    user_id int PK, 
    ...
    ...
)

user_cat (
    user_cat_id int PK,
    user_id int FK,
    effective_date date,
    location_id FK,          <-- dup
    qualification_id FK,     <-- dup
    business_id FK           <-- dup
)

user_admin_cat (
    admin_cat_id int PK,
    user_id int FK,
    effective_date date,
    company_id FK,
    location_id FK,          <-- dup
    qualification_id FK,     <-- dup
    business_id FK           <-- dup
)

Here's what I have considered doing to minimize the duplication:

user (
    user_id int PK, 
    ...
    ...
)

user_cat (
    user_cat_id int PK,
    user_id int FK,
    effective_date date,
    shared_id, FK            <-- dup
)

user_admin_cat (
    admin_cat_id int PK,
    user_id int FK,
    effective_date date,
    company_id FK,
    shared_id, FK            <-- dup
)

shared_user_cat_fks (
    shared_id int PK,
    location_id FK,
    qualification_id FK,
    business_id FK
)

What I would like to learn is the answer to one or more of the following questions:

(1) If you would use the normalization solution, why is that better?
(2) If you would not use the normalization solution, what would you do? Why is this solution better?
(3) If you would not use the normalization solution because there are duplicates in only two tables, how many tables of duplicates should there be before you would do something? What solution would you implement? Why is this a good solution?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

From what you describe I don't see a reason to 'normalize' it. I'd even say this has nothing to do with normalization.

My personal simple rule for normalization is: do I have to do more then one insert/update/delete on change of a single fact.

Or are there combination of facts I can't represent.

Or are there facts I can represent in two different ways?

I don't see that here.

So my answer to 2 is: Nothing, because there is no problem.

There might be some hidden denormalization though. But its not in what you describe.

share|improve this answer

1) The normalized scheme has cleaner design and is easier to maintain.

2) Sometimes non-normalized layouts are better in terms of effectiveness. Say, if there are lot of queries to the small table user_cat and nearly no queries to the huge user_admin_cat and nobody needs the UNION -- it may be effective.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply Dmitry. –  Darin Peterson Apr 24 '12 at 15:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.