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Consider the following table of tweets

id  tweet
------------------------------------------------------
1   alcoa inc stock analysis
2   bullrider has added alcoa inc to portfolio
3   caterpillar annual results
4   more at http://bit.ly/d3423 on caterpillar
5   making apple inc profits

I would like to replace company names with a specified label, as follows:

id  tweet
------------------------------------------------------
1   {COMPANY|AA} stock analysis
2   bullrider has added {COMPANY|AA} to portfolio
3   {COMPANY|CAT} annual results
4   more at http://bit.ly/d3423 on {COMPANY|CAT}
5   making {COMPANY|AAPL} profits

I now have the following query:

UPDATE
  tweets
SET
  tweet = REPLACE(tweet, 'alcoa inc', '{COMPANY|AA}')
WHERE
  tweet LIKE '% alcoa inc %'
OR
  tweet LIKE 'alcoa inc %'
OR
  tweet LIKE '% alcoa inc'

I have two questions, though:

  1. Isn't there a better way to catch all possible "alcoa inc" instances?
  2. Is it possible in SQL to write a sort of an array for multiple replacements (in SQL, so not from within PHP). Here. I mean defining in SQL something like array("alcoa inc" => "{COMPANY|AA}", "caterpillar" => "{COMPANY|CAT}", "apple inc" => "{COMPANY{AAPL}") and loop through it in SQL for a mass-replace.

Your help is appreciated :-)

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you just use tweet LIKE '%alcoa inc%'? –  Lamak Apr 23 '12 at 19:29
4  
I would guess it's so it doesn't match, for example, balcoa inc. –  mellamokb Apr 23 '12 at 19:30
    
exactly what mellamokb says –  Pr0no Apr 23 '12 at 19:31
    
@mellamokb - You are right, didn't think of it –  Lamak Apr 23 '12 at 19:34
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could try storing the list of tickers and companies in a table and use a query like this:

select
    case
        when c.ticker is not null then
            replace(t.tweet, c.name,
                    concat('{COMPANY|',c.ticker,'}'))
        else t.tweet
    end as tweet
from
    tweets t
left join
    company c
        on
            t.tweet like concat('% ', c.name, ' %')
        or
            t.tweet like concat(c.name, ' %')
        or
            t.tweet like concat('% ', c.name)
group by
    t.id

The only downside being this solution won't handle the case where two companies' names appear in the same tweet. Only one of them will get replaced.

Demo: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/8da9d/2


Edit: As pointed out by @Mario, it's possible that the matching will cause an incorrect replacement if there are multiple instances in the same string. For instance, using the string I have a redapple from apple with the replacement apple will result in the string I have a red{COMPANY|AAPL} from {COMPANY|AAPL} because the second apple triggers a LIKE match, then the REPLACE replaces every match. I have an updated query that handles this situation as well by reading the matching strings out of a table as well:

select
    case
        when p.ticker is not null then
            replace(t.tweet,
                replace(p.replacestr, '{0}', p.name),
                replace(p.replacestr, '{0}', concat('{COMPANY|',p.ticker,'}')))
        else t.tweet
    end as tweet
from
    tweets t
left join
    (select * from pattern,company) p
        on t.tweet like replace(p.pattern, '{0}', p.name);
group by
    t.id

Where Pattern is a table defined like this:

CREATE TABLE Pattern
    (pattern varchar(50), replacestr varchar(50));

INSERT INTO Pattern
    (pattern, replacestr)
VALUES
    ('% {0} %', ' {0} '),
    ('{0} %', '{0} '),
    ('% {0}', ' {0}');

Demo: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/c71d4/3

share|improve this answer
    
But as I understand, this could be solved by running the query twice, no? –  Pr0no Apr 23 '12 at 20:32
    
Technically yes that would solve it. –  mellamokb Apr 23 '12 at 21:28
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Isn't there a better way to catch all possible "alcoa inc" instances?

REGEX(Reqular Expression) search. Take a look a the official mysql REGEX documentation for further information.

Is it possible in SQL to write a sort of an array for multiple replacements (in SQL, so not from within PHP). Here. I mean defining in SQL something like array("alcoa inc" => "{COMPANY|AA}", "caterpillar" => "{COMPANY|CAT}", "apple inc" => "{COMPANY{AAPL}") and loop through it in SQL for a mass-replace.

Yes, you can create a specific table to store the key->value dictionary and then get value from it, so fo example :

 table : dictionary
+----------+-----------------------+---------------+
| name     | pattern               | replacement   |
+----------+-----------------------+---------------+
|alcoa inc | [[:space:]]+alcoa inc |{COMPANY|AA}   |
|apple inc | apple inc.*           |{COMPANY{AAPL} |

And you can update with a query like the following, for example :

UPDATE tweets SET tweets = REPLACE(tweet, 'alcoa inc', '{COMPANY|AA}') 
WHERE  tweet RLIKE (SELECT pattern FROM dictionary WHERE name = 'alcoa inc');

It is only an example to illustrate a possible way, you have to tune it for your requirements and specific context.

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One way of doing it is with a stored procedure:

CREATE PROCEDURE UpdateTweetsWithCompany
    @CompanyName varchar(255) = 'alcoa inc',
    @ReplaceValue varchar(255) = '{COMPANY|AA}'
AS
BEGIN
    UPDATE
      tweets
    SET
      tweet = REPLACE(tweet, @CompanyName, @ReplaceValue)
    WHERE
      tweet LIKE '% ' + @CompanyName + ' %'
    OR
      tweet LIKE @CompanyName + ' %'
    OR
      tweet LIKE '% ' + @CompanyName
END

And then call it, somewhat like this:

EXEC UpdateTweetsWithCompany 'alcoa inc', '{COMPANY|AA}'
share|improve this answer
    
Though, the REPLACE would still replace a string like 'balcoa inc' to 'b{COMPANY|AA}'. –  Mario Apr 23 '12 at 19:47
    
It shouldn't because of the filters provided in WHERE..LIKE –  mellamokb Apr 24 '12 at 12:10
2  
@mellamokb a tweet could be "I had a redapple from apple" and the REPLACE would change all occurrences. E,g: If we'd change "apple" to "{COMPANY|AA}" it would end up as: "I had a red{COMPANY|AA} from {COMPANY|AA}". Even though the WHERE clause would find " apple". –  Mario Apr 24 '12 at 12:17
    
Ah. In that case it's because the second apple triggers the match via the third LIKE statement, and then the replace actually affects both. I see now. –  mellamokb Apr 24 '12 at 12:44
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