Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to understand a problem I have run into that I don't believe should be possible when dealing with transactions utilizing the read committed isolation level. I have a table that is being used as a queue. In one thread (connection 1) I insert multiple batches of 20 records into each table. Each batch of 20 records is performed inside a transaction. In a second thread (connection 2) I perform an update to change the status of the records that have been inserted into the queue, which also occurs inside a transaction. When running concurrently, it is my expectation that the number of rows affected by the update (connection 2) should be a multiple of 20, since connection 1 is inserting rows in the table inserts in batches of 20 rows within a transaction.

But my testing shows this is not always the case, and on occasion I'm able to update a subset of records from connection 1's batch. Should this be possible or am I missing something about transactions, concurrency, and isolation levels? Below is a set of test scripts I created to reproduce this issue in T-SQL.

This script inserts 20,000 records into the table in transaction batches of 20.

USE ReadTest
GO

SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL READ COMMITTED
GO

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @trans_id INTEGER
DECLARE @cmd_id INTEGER
DECLARE @text_str VARCHAR(4000)

SET @trans_id = 0
SET @text_str = 'Placeholder String Value'                

-- First empty the table
DELETE FROM TABLE_A

WHILE @trans_id < 1000 BEGIN
    SET @trans_id = @trans_id + 1
    SET @cmd_id = 0

    BEGIN TRANSACTION
--  Insert 20 records into the table per transaction
    WHILE @cmd_id < 20 BEGIN
        SET @cmd_id = @cmd_id + 1

        INSERT INTO TABLE_A ( transaction_id, command_id, [type], status, text_field ) 
            VALUES ( @trans_id, @cmd_id, 1, 1,  @text_str )
    END             
    COMMIT

END

PRINT 'DONE'

This script updates the records in the table, changing the status from 1 to 2 and then checks the rowcount from the update operation. When the rowcount is not a multiple of 20, and print statement indicates this and the number of rows affected.

USE ReadTest
GO

SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL READ COMMITTED
GO

SET NOCOUNT ON
DECLARE @loop_counter INTEGER
DECLARE @trans_id INTEGER
DECLARE @count INTEGER

SET @loop_counter = 0

WHILE @loop_counter < 100000 BEGIN

    SET @loop_counter = @loop_counter + 1
    BEGIN TRANSACTION
        UPDATE TABLE_A SET status = 2 
        WHERE status = 1
            and type = 1
        SET @count = @@ROWCOUNT
    COMMIT

    IF ( @count % 20 <> 0 ) BEGIN
--      Records in concurrent transaction inserting in batches of 20 records before commit.
        PRINT '*** Rowcount not a multiple of 20. Count = ' + CAST(@count AS VARCHAR) + ' ***'
    END

    IF @count > 0 BEGIN
--      Delete the records where the status was changed.
        DELETE TABLE_A WHERE status = 2
    END
END

PRINT 'DONE'

This script creates the test queue table in a new database called ReadTest.

USE master;
GO

IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.databases WHERE name = 'ReadTest')
  BEGIN;
  DROP DATABASE ReadTest;
  END;
GO

CREATE DATABASE ReadTest;
GO

ALTER DATABASE ReadTest
SET ALLOW_SNAPSHOT_ISOLATION OFF
GO

ALTER DATABASE ReadTest
SET READ_COMMITTED_SNAPSHOT OFF
GO

USE ReadTest
GO

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[TABLE_A](
    [ROWGUIDE] [uniqueidentifier] NOT NULL,
    [TRANSACTION_ID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [COMMAND_ID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [TYPE] [int] NOT NULL,
    [STATUS] [int] NOT NULL,
    [TEXT_FIELD] [varchar](4000) NULL
 CONSTRAINT [PK_TABLE_A] PRIMARY KEY NONCLUSTERED 
(
    [ROWGUIDE] ASC
) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[TABLE_A] ADD  DEFAULT (newsequentialid()) FOR [ROWGUIDE]
GO
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You expectations are completely misplaced. You have never expressed in your query the requirement to 'dequeue' exactly 20 rows. The UPDATE can return 0, 19, 20, 21 or 1000 rows and all results are correct, as long as the status is 1 and type is 1. If you expect that the 'dequeue' occurs in the order of the 'enqueue' (which is somehow eluded to in your question, but never explicitly stated) then your 'dequeue' operation must contain an ORDER BY clause. Had you add such an explicitly stated requirement then your expectation that 'dequeue' always return an entire batch of 'enqueue' rows (ie. multiple of 20 rows) would be one step closer to being a reasonable expectation. As things stand right now, is, as I said, completely misplaced.

For a lengthier discussion see Using Tables as Queues.

I shouldn't be concerned that while one transaction is committing a batch of 20 inserted records, another concurrent transaction is only able to update a subset of those records and not all 20?

Basically the question boils down to If I SELECT while I INSERT, how many inserted rows will I see?. You only have a right to be concerned if the isolation level is declared as SERIALIZABLE. None of the other isolation levels make any prediction about how many rows inserted while the UPDATE was running will be visible. Only SERIALIZABLE states that the outcome has to be the same as running the two statements one after another (ie. serialized, hence the name). While the technical details of how the UPDATE 'sees' only part of the INSERT batch are easy to understand once you consider physical order and the lack of ORDER BY clause, the explanation is irrelevant. The fundamental issue is that the expectation is non-warranted. Even if the 'issue' is 'fixed' by adding a proper ORDER BY and the correct clustered index key (the article linked above explains the details), the expectation is still non-warranted. It will still be perfectly legal for the UPDATE to 'see' 1, 19 or 21 rows, although it will be unlikely to happen.

I guess I've always understood READ COMMITTED to only read committed data, and that a transaction commit is an atomic operation, making all the changes that occurred in the transaction available at once.

That is correct. What is incorrect is to expect that a concurrent SELECT (or update) to see the entire change, irrelevant of where it happens to be in the execution. Open an SSMS query and run the following:

use tempdb;
go

create table test (a int not null primary key, b int);
go

insert into test (a, b) values (5,0)
go

begin transaction
insert into test (a, b) values (10,0)

Now open a new SSMS query and run the following:

update test 
    set b=1
    output inserted.*
    where b=0

This will block behind the uncommitted INSERT. Now go back to first query and run the following:

insert into test (a, b) values (1,0)
commit

When this commits, the second SSMS query will finish, and it will return two rows, not three. QED. This is READ COMMITTED. What you expect is SERIALIZABLE execution (in which case the example above will deadlock).

share|improve this answer
    
In my example I am only deleting from the queue, the records that were updated by the same connection to status = 2. But lets remove the delete from the code to simplify, my original concern still exists, which is the fact that the update statement returns a row count that is not a multiple of 20, which is the batch size of the concurrent transaction that is inserting records into the database. –  A. Barton Apr 23 '12 at 20:20
    
The fact that you separate the update from the delete is irrelevant. Your concern is still completely unfounded. –  Remus Rusanu Apr 23 '12 at 20:44
    
So I shouldn't be concerned that while one transaction is committing a batch of 20 inserted records, another concurrent transaction is only able to update a subset of those records and not all 20? Please explain, I'd like to understand how this is a possibility. –  A. Barton Apr 23 '12 at 21:01
    
Thanks for the update. I guess I've always understood READ COMMITTED to only read committed data, and that a transaction commit is an atomic operation, making all the changes that occurred in the transaction available at once. –  A. Barton Apr 23 '12 at 22:12
    
Very interesting. So because a row is inserted prior to top row based on the clustered index (column a), but after the update is blocked, the update does not affect the row, but if the row inserted comes after the top row, then the row is updated. Using that information, I should change the clustered index my table to be transaction_id, command_id, which are ever increasing identifiers that are inserted in ascending order into the table. –  A. Barton Apr 24 '12 at 20:47

It could happen like this:

  1. The writer/inserter writes 20 rows (does not commit)
  2. The reader/updater reads one row (which is not committed - it discards it)
  3. The writer/inserter commits
  4. The reader/updater reads 19 rows which are now committed thus visible

I believe that only an isolation level of serializable (or snapshot isolation which is more concurrent) fixes this.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would the reader/updater read one row in step 2 if the isolation level is READ COMMITTED? It is my understanding that with the isolation level set to READ COMMITTED, changes occurring in an uncommitted transaction should not be visible/readable by an external transaction. –  A. Barton Apr 23 '12 at 19:35
    
Yes, they are not visible. Yet, they exist on disk so they must be read to advance the table scan! You just don't get to see them because they get discarded immediately in the scan. –  usr Apr 23 '12 at 19:36
    
But in that case I would expect a rowcount from the update to be zero and once the commit has been issued by the other thread, the update rowcount should return 20. For the transaction, it should be all or none as far as being able to read/update the records from first transaction, correct? –  A. Barton Apr 23 '12 at 19:50
1  
Updates are a sequence of two steps: read the rows to be updated and update them. These two steps do not occur atomically! Let's do a thought experiment: We are inserting batches of 100TB of data. The final commit is pending. The updating session starts to read the rows which are to be updated. It will take a while to scan the table (hours). Mid-way the inserting session commits. Now all 100TB of rows are suddenly/atomically visible yet the reading session only sees part of it. Read committed does not provide atomicity in case of concurrency! Only regarding durability. There is a difference. –  usr Apr 23 '12 at 20:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.