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I am new in R programming. I want to write a function which has two arguments:

myfunc = function(val,class) { ... }

where:

val = c(1,5,10) 
class = c("yes","no","no")

The function should return the splitting point and the Gini index or a message that No splitting is required.

The splitting point is the mean. e.g mean(1, 5) = 3

share|improve this question
1  
Can you expand a little on what it is you're doing with this function? does it take every combination? every adjacent pair? and what class does it return in the (1,5) = 3 example? – Justin Apr 23 '12 at 20:37
    
Perhaps look at the rpart package (or the party package). The use of the words "Gini index" and "splitting" make me think you are talking about recursive partitioning. – Brian Diggs Apr 23 '12 at 21:31
    
This function will execute binary discretization with the help of Gini index. The first argument takes values of a continuous variable and the second of a binary one.It takes one by one pair.e.g 1 corresponds to "yes", 5 corresponds to "no", e.t.c. We want after the definition of the function to exist the following lines: val=c(1,5,10) class1=c("yes","no","no") class2=c("no","no","no") print(myfunc(val,class1)) print(myfunc(val,class1)) and the output should be: [1] "The splitting point is ? and the Gini is ?" [1] No Splitting is required" – Manos Apr 23 '12 at 22:10
    
You need to be clear about what you want the result to be. I don't know what you mean by "Gini index" unless you're looking for a regular sequence of values. Looking for the mean suggests that you might. But what does this "class" variable have to do with anything, considering that you give two values? – Matthew Lundberg Apr 24 '12 at 3:49

NOTE: Function updated as interpreted from the comments following this answer.

It sounds like you're trying to write a function like the following, but with your description, I'm sort of stabbing in the dark here:

splitting = function(aa, bb) {
  out = vector("list", length(bb))

  for (i in 1:length(bb)) {
    if (bb[i] == "no") {
      out[[i]] = "No splitting is required"
    } else if (bb[i] == "yes") {
      a = c(aa[i], aa[i+1])
      b = mean(a)
      gini = 1-(aa[i]/sum(a))^2 - (aa[i+1]/sum(a))^2
      out[[i]] = paste("The splitting point is", b, 
                       "and the gini is", round(gini, digits=3))
    }
  }
  out
}

Some example data:

val = c(1, 5, 10)
class1 = c("yes", "no", "no")
class2 = c("yes", "yes", "no")

Running the function on the example data:

> splitting(val, class1)
[[1]]
[1] "The splitting point is 3 and the gini is 0.278"

[[2]]
[1] "No splitting is required"

[[3]]
[1] "No splitting is required"

> splitting(val, class2)
[[1]]
[1] "The splitting point is 3 and the gini is 0.278"

[[2]]
[1] "The splitting point is 7.5 and the gini is 0.444"

[[3]]
[1] "No splitting is required"

But you don't say anything in your question about what the expected "gini" should be ... or how you might want to deal with a splitting point if the last element in your vector is "yes". (This function will yield a The splitting point is NA if you had yes as the last element in your class.)

Can you explain how you plan to use the output? This doesn't seem to be in a very user-friendly format.

Modified function for output as a data.frame

It would seem to me that this data would be more useful as a data.frame where I can access the values the function generates. Thus, (again, not knowing how Manos plans to use this data) I've modified the function as follows:

splitting = function(aa, bb) {
  out = vector("list", length(bb))

  for (i in 1:length(bb)) {
    if (bb[i] == "no") {
      out[[i]] = data.frame(SPLIT.PT = "NA", GINI = "NA")
    } else if (bb[i] == "yes") {
      a = c(aa[i], aa[i+1])
      b = mean(a)
      gini = 1-(aa[i]/sum(a))^2 - (aa[i+1]/sum(a))^2
      out[[i]] = data.frame(SPLIT.PT = b, 
                            GINI = round(gini, digits=3))
    }
  }
  cbind(VALUE=aa, CLASS=bb, do.call(rbind, out))
}

Which gives us output like the following:

> splitting(val, class1)
  VALUE CLASS SPLIT.PT  GINI
1     1   yes        3 0.278
2     5    no       NA    NA
3    10    no       NA    NA
> splitting(val, class2)
  VALUE CLASS SPLIT.PT  GINI
1     1   yes        3 0.278
2     5   yes      7.5 0.444
3    10    no       NA    NA

To get a line after the data frame identifying the minimum gini, change the line:

  cbind(VALUE=aa, CLASS=bb, do.call(rbind, out))

to:

  temp = cbind(VALUE=aa, CLASS=bb, do.call(rbind, out))
  mingini = which.min(temp$GINI)
  return(list(temp, paste("The splitting point is", 
                          temp$SPLIT.PT[mingini],
                          "and the gini is",
                          temp$GINI[mingini], 
                          "( see row", mingini, ")")))

But in my mind, this reduces the ease of use of the output.

If this solves your problem, please mark the answer as accepted.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you all.Sorry in advance, because i cannot express very well what i want.The answer of mrdwab is in the right direction.What i want additionally is my function to estimate for every interval e,g(3,7.5) e.t.c the gini index and then return the splitting point with the smallest gini index. – Manos Apr 24 '12 at 15:24
    
Gini()=1-Σ[p(i)]^2, from i=0 to c-1, where c is the number of classes(in our case c=2) and p is the prob one value to belong among the two categories. Example: (tree)Node N1 class1 has value:1, class2 has value 5. Then the gini=1-(1/6)^2 -(5/6)^2 =0.278 – Manos Apr 24 '12 at 16:11
    
mrdwab you are an expert!It is very close.Can you add at the output "The splitting point is 3 and the Gini is 0.278 (ie to choose the min gini) – Manos Apr 24 '12 at 17:48
    
To the second one please. – Manos Apr 24 '12 at 19:51

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