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First of all, i am new to ANTLR. What i am asking may be trivial for the rest of you guys, but i need your help.

I want to match all the qualified names within a stream, and ignore the rest of the characters from the stream.

I tried the following:

findAllQualifiedNames
    :   qualifiedName+
    ;

qualifiedName 
    :   IDENTIFIER
        ('.' IDENTIFIER)*
    ;

IDENTIFIER
    :   ('_'
    |   '$'
    |   ('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z'))
        ('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z' | '0'..'9' | '_' | '$')*
    ;
AnyOtherChar
    :   . 
    {$channel=HIDDEN;}
    ;

But it doesn't work the way i expected: for the input a.b.c;d.e.f;, it matches only a.b.c as a qualified name. And i get the error:

No viable alternative at ;

EDIT:

For the grammar above, i tried the following input: a.b.c; d.e.f; .. {x.y;}

I expected to match a.b.c, d.e.f and x.y, but i get the following:

Eclipse plugin interpreter

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1  
how does it work? –  Dmitry Beransky Apr 23 '12 at 20:19
    
for the input a.b.c;d.e.f; , it matches only a.b.c as a qualified name. And i get the error: No viable alternative at ; –  user1019710 Apr 23 '12 at 20:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

But it doesn't work the way i expected: for the input a.b.c;d.e.f;, it matches only a.b.c as a qualified name. And i get the error: ...

I cannot reproduce that.

Using the debugger from ANTLRWorks 1.4.3, I get the following parse tree:

enter image description here

(as you can see, no error/warning is printed on the output-screen (lower-left corner))

Of course, you'll need to account for text inside string literals and comments that "look" like qualified names, but I showed that in a previous Q&A of yours (I'm posting this last remark more for future readers that might think it's that easy to fetch all qualified names from a Java source file).

EDIT

The fact that a.b.c; d.e.f; .. {x.y;} produces error(s) is because the two .'s (dots) in there. The dot is being tokenized separately, not as a AnyOtherChar token.

Defining literal tokens inside parser rules (like you did with '.' in qualifiedName) does not cause these tokens to be created only in those parser rules. The following two grammars are identical:

1

qualifiedName : IDENTIFIER ('.' IDENTIFIER)*;
IDENTIFIER    : ('_' | '$' | 'a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z')+;

2

qualifiedName : IDENTIFIER (DOT IDENTIFIER)*;
IDENTIFIER    : ('_' | '$' | 'a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z')+;
DOT           : '.';
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thank you for your detailed answer. I edited my question, please take a look. –  user1019710 Apr 24 '12 at 16:20
    
@user1019710, see my EDIT. –  Bart Kiers Apr 24 '12 at 18:34
    
ok i got it now. But is there a way to ignore these dots when they're not inside an IDENTIFIER? –  user1019710 Apr 24 '12 at 20:43
    
@user1019710, ignore them? If they're there, they must be accounted for, right? Not sure what you expect to happen in such cases... –  Bart Kiers May 1 '12 at 10:25

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