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We are using .Net with Nhibernate and Castle for IOC (for all services and repositories). Something strange has started happening with the most recent deployment and I'm having trouble tracking the issue down.

We have the following chunk of code in the repository that is called from a service after an ObjA is created:

    public void Save(IList<ObjA> listA, IList<ObjB> listB, ObjC c, Objd d) {
        using (var session = GetSession()) {
            using (var tx = session.BeginTransaction()) {
                try {
                    session.Save(c);
                    foreach (var a in listA) {
                        session.Update(a);
                    }
                    foreach (var b in listB) {
                        // unrelated field updates here
                        session.Save(b);
                    }
                    session.Update(d);
                    if (!tx.WasCommitted) {
                        tx.Commit();
                    }
                } catch (Exception) {
                    if (tx != null) {
                        tx.Rollback();
                    }
                    throw;
                }
            }
        }
    }

This code is called passing 1 ObjA in listA, 1 ObjB in listB, plus ObjC and ObjD.

We are finding that randomly (for about half of the time it's called) we are getting duplicate ObjB and ObjC records (the only objects here that are being created instead of updated). Since ObjC has a datetime field I can track when the records are created and there are anywhere from 5-100 duplicate records created sometimes over a period of ~12-18 hours. This is the only code that is creating ObjB and ObjC records in the database.

I've never seen anything like this before, it seems like something is stuck in memory and keeps calling this function (or the Nhibernate calls) intermittently. I restarted IIS on one of the servers that seemed to be having this issue and the issue stopped, but then started up the next day on a different server.

Does anyone have any ideas on what could be causing this? Is there something in the configuration for either Castle or Nhibernate that could be causing these calls to get stuck and repeated over 12-18 hours (over 100 times?)?

Any help is appreciated :)

Service(){

    _saveLater = null;

    CalledByWS(){
        CreateObjA();
        CreateOtherObjs();  

    }   

    CreateObjA(){
        //Do a lot of stuff here

        var a = new ObjA{ };
        listToBeSaved.Add(a, SaveOrUpdate.Save);

        //Update other objects & add to the list

        if(xyz){
            _saveLater.ObjA = a
            _saveLater.ObjB = GetObjB(a);
            _saveLater.ObjC = GetObjC(a);   
        }

        _repo.SaveOrUpdate(listToBeSaved);
    }

    CreateOtherObjs(){
        if(_saveLater == null) return;

        Save(new List<ObjA> {_saveLater.ObjA}, new List<ObjB> {_saveLater.ObjB},
                _saveLater.Objc, _saveLater.ObjD);  //The original function posted
    }
}

Repo(){

  SaveOrUpdate(Dictionary<IEntity, SaveOrUpdate> objs){
    using (var session = GetSession()){
      using (var tx = session.BeginTransaction()) {
        try {
            foreach (var o in objs) {
                if (o.Key == null) continue;
                if (o.Value == SaveOrUpdate.Update)
                    session.Update(o.Key);
                else
                    session.Save(o.Key);
            }
            if (!tx.WasCommitted) {
                tx.Commit();
            }
        } catch (Exception) {
            if (tx != null) {
                tx.Rollback();
            }
            throw;
        }
      }
        }
    }


}
share|improve this question
    
Have you stepped through the code? Is there a a bunch of duplicate objects in your listB collection when you persist them? You are doing a session.Save(c), save is insert only, so every time you call this function you will save a new record for C. I can only guess that this save function is being called multiple times with the same object data (do a find usages on the function in VS). There is no reason for Nhibernate to keep inserting these if the function does not run. –  David C Apr 23 '12 at 20:52
    
Can you post your mapping for object B and C ? –  kevin durante Apr 23 '12 at 20:54
    
@DavidC I have stepped through the code and found only 1 of each object are being created. Also, the development database shows only 1 record created. We have integration tests that were run successfully without any duplicate records. It was only when the code was deployed that these issues showed up. The records are being inserted across several up to 18+ hours. –  Amy Apr 23 '12 at 21:17
    
@kevindurante mappings are added –  Amy Apr 23 '12 at 21:17

2 Answers 2

Before I went looking for a more complex issue like a call getting stuck in memory or something like that I'd put my money on the Save function itself getting triggered multiple times. Notice the only duplicates you're noticing are the objects that are being saved. It's probable that the updates are running multiple times as well there's just no observable side effects from this.

Is this method being called from a web application? Is the submit button being double clicked? You could test this theory by adding a logging mechanism and logging when the Save method is being called and the parameters it's being called with.

share|improve this answer
    
The method is being called from a webservice call from a thirdparty. This ws call does a lot of processing and finally creates 1 ObjA. After ObjA is created, the problematic function is called up to create the two objects (b & c) as well as updating the newly created ObjA and related object ObjD. We log every time the thirdparty calls the webservice pass or fail and I am only seeing 1 entry for each ObjA. Each ObjA that's created should also have an ObjB & ObjC (ObjD is pre-existing). What we are actually seeing is 1 ObjA with anywhere from 1-105 each of ObjB & ObjC. –  Amy Apr 23 '12 at 21:25
    
You're not creating any ObjA elements in the code you've posted. You're just updating them. To be honest it seems like you're trying to obfuscate the code a bit in order to protect the identity of this application but really there's too little here for anyone to make a good assessment of what is going on. –  Spencer Ruport Apr 23 '12 at 21:33
    
I've not posted any of the code that creates ObjA, that was older code that has not shown any issues. It's quite complicated and has been tested extensively. The code posted above is the code that was added in the most recent deployment that is causing the issues. I've tried to simplify the code to show only what could be problematic. –  Amy Apr 23 '12 at 22:27
    
My point is I do not believe the issue is anywhere in the code you posted but rather somewhere in the way it is called. –  Spencer Ruport Apr 23 '12 at 22:47

Amy, if you look at the end result of whats happening, it tells you what is going on. Your passing ObjA and it's supposed to "create" multiple ObjB records, and 1 ObjC record for each unique ObjA. I am guessing you are relating your ObjA with ObjB's and ObjC outside the scope of this function, and then relying on the save to persist that change. Think of it this way, ultimately there are many different ObjB records with a foreign key back to the same ObjA record and most of them are not correct. For some reason your production code is associating an ObjA with the same Id for the ObjB's and an ObjC that are passed into this function. The relationship code could even be associating them before setting the ObjA that gets passed into the function. Check your newing of the ObjA and record association code prior to calling the save. You may want to consider that one of your third party vendors calling the service may be sending you the same data multiple times.

share|improve this answer
    
We've ruled out the possibility that the ws is being call multiple times because each time the main ws function is called, we log it. Also, the main ws function creates an ObjA record and we are only seeing 1 of those. It is only the ObjB and ObjC we are seeing duplicates of and it is the new function that was added with the most recent deployment that creates those objects. We are not always seeing duplicates, for each ObjA in the DB, approx half of those have more than 1 ObjB & ObjC (always the same number of B & C too). –  Amy Apr 26 '12 at 20:24
    
When I restart IIS, the duplicates seem to stop for a bit. When they do start up again, it is new calls only that get duplicated and the old records from before the restart are no longer being added. For example, querying the db with a count of ObjBs related to an ObjA (ordered by date), I would get the following 1,1,4,5,100 then several hours after a restart the results look something like this 1,1,4,5,100,1,1,1,1,60,23,31,14. Querying on a regular basis after I would see the most recent "batch" 60,23,31,14 may become 62,44,34,16 but the older "batch" of 4,5,100 will no longer increment. –  Amy Apr 26 '12 at 20:31
    
This odd behaviour of the duplicates stopping for a while after restart, combined with the logging and the duplicates happening over such a long period of time is what's leading me to suspect it's a problem with Nhibernate and/or Castle and the cache/memory. –  Amy Apr 26 '12 at 20:35
    
Amy, there are two caching mechanisms in Nhibernate, one is the Session level cache, which basically means if you use session.load, it will cache the object in the session, and all changes to that object will be persisted in the cache until the cache is flushed, session committed or rolled back, etc... In this case, where your subsequent web service calls should be spinning up a new nhibernate session, you would not be able to get a duplicate unless you specifically loaded an entity with the same id. –  David C May 1 '12 at 18:48
    
The other caching mechanism is called the second level cache. If your app is configured to use the second level cache, then the system will cache objects pulled from session.load commands and queries issued with the .Cacheable() into the second level cache. This means that all requests for an object of a given identifier or expression, will be pulled from the cache or modified in the cache, until some transaction commits that entity from the cache, these will not change in the database. –  David C May 1 '12 at 18:51

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