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I have a MySQL table where I'm trying to find a person by his full name. The problem is that first and last name are stored on two separate rows in the table as shown here:

+-----------------+-------------+-------------+--------------+
| submit_time     | form_name   | field_name  | field_value  |
+-----------------+-------------+-------------+--------------+
| 1323463601.0947 | Online Form | firstname   | Paulo        |
| 1323463601.0947 | Online Form | lastname    | Hill         |
+-----------------+-------------+-------------+--------------+

How can I construct a query that will get a single result (if possible) by searching for Paulo Hill?

Also, the submit_time column should have the same value for both rows--that will be the one column value that is unique in the table.

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Looks like an EAV data model except that I don't see any Entity ID to link the two rows together. Are these all the columns? –  Joe Stefanelli Apr 23 '12 at 21:14
    
If submit_time is the same in each row, how can it possibly be unique in the table? And are you sure two forms can't be sumitted at the same time? –  Madbreaks Apr 23 '12 at 21:23
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use a self-join:

SELECT t1.submit_time, t1.field_value, t2.field_value
FROM your_table t1
INNER JOIN your_table t2 ON t2.submit_time = t1.submit_time
WHERE t1.field_name = 'firstname'
AND t1.field_value = 'Paulo'
AND t2.field_name = 'lastname'
AND t2.field_value = 'Hill'
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@PabloSantaCruz 'Paulo Hill' is the search term. ...What do you mean, exactly? –  Dan J Apr 23 '12 at 21:15
    
You are right. I don't know what I was thinking... –  Pablo Santa Cruz Apr 23 '12 at 21:17
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Supposing 'paulo hill' is a single search query:

    SELECT t1.*,
           t2.field_value
      FROM tbl t1
INNER JOIN tbl t2 ON t1.submit_time = t2.submit_time
       AND t2.field_name = 'lastname'
     WHERE t1.field_name = 'firstname'
       AND t1.field_value || ' ' || t2.field_value = 'paulo hill'

Note: this solution is sensitive to amount of spaces between first name and last name in search query

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Your first query would find "Paulo Hill", but since you're not restricting the field_name it could also get false positives, like somebody named "Jonah Hill" with a dog named "Paulo", or somebody named "Paulo Smith" who lives on a "hill", etc. –  Ike Walker Apr 23 '12 at 21:23
    
@Ike Walker: yep, remove it then, since it is not an answer anyway –  zerkms Apr 23 '12 at 21:24
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try this:

SELECT * FROM (
  SELECT submit_time, group_concat(field_value SEPARATOR  ' ')  AS fullname
  FROM TABLE_NAME
  GROUP BY `submit_time`
) AS innertable
WHERE fullname='Paulo Hill'
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group by doesn't define order for other columns –  zerkms Apr 23 '12 at 21:45
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One alternative is to use GROUP_CONCAT if you know the order:

SELECT GROUP_CONCAT(field_value SEPARATOR ' ') 
FROM tab
GROUP BY submit_time
HAVING GROUP_CONCAT(field_value ORDER BY field_id ASC) LIKE '%Paulo,Hill%'
share|improve this answer
    
group by doesn't define order for other columns –  zerkms Apr 23 '12 at 21:45
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