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Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong here?

var spanclickhandler = $('.officeapprovalspan').click(function () {
    // do some stuff
});

Basically, I have this spanclickhandler. Anything with the class officeapprovalspan on loading the page gets this assigned to its click event. No problems there.

In another place I have the code:

$(this).replaceWith('<span class="officeapprovalspan">wero<span>');
$(document).on('click', '.officeapprovalspan', spanclickhandler);

So I'm replacing some HTML with a new span of this class. I use the on to add the click event to the spans of class officeapprovalspan. I gather I have to do this because the new span will not have the click handler attached to it.

So that's OK, but when I click the new span I get this error:

enter image description here

Anyone know what I'm doing wrong and how to fix?

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1  
.click() returns the jQuery object it was called on, not a function. Then you are trying to use this jQuery object as an event handler. It's like you called $(document).on('click', '.officeapprovalspan', $('.officeapprovalspan')); which does not make a lot of sense. –  Felix Kling Apr 23 '12 at 21:29
    
I would look at using a loop function for this. for (var i = 0, len = var.length; i < len; i = i + 1) and use a type of event utility. This most likely will not work with all browsers. –  Kyle Monti Apr 23 '12 at 21:40

5 Answers 5

The click method doesn't return the event handler, it returns the jQuery object. Define the event handler first, and use it in the click method:

var spanclickhandler = function () {
    ...

    do some stuff

    ...
};

$('.officeapprovalspan').click(spanclickhandler);
share|improve this answer

This chunk of code doesn't do what you think it does (I'm pretty sure that handler function isn't returned):

var spanclickhandler = $('.officeapprovalspan').click(function () {
    ...

    do some stuff

    ...
});

I suggest you code it like this, which should work:

var spanclickhandler = function () {
    ...

    do some stuff

    ...
}

$('.officeapprovalspan').click(spanclickhandler);
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you gessed right, the click method doesn't return the function, it returns the jQuery object that it's used on. –  Guffa Apr 23 '12 at 21:50

What you want to do is:

var spanclickhandler = function () {
        ...

        do some stuff

        ...
};

$(this).replaceWith('<span class="officeapprovalspan">wero<span>');
$('.officeapprovalspan').on('click', spanclickhandler);

OR BETTER

$(document).on('click', '.officeapprovalspan' function () {
        ...

        do some stuff

        ...
});
// Because 'on' will attach event on DOM element even if they are not created yet, if you define a selector descendant inside. You can replace `document` by the nearest top parent of all your `.officeapprovalspan` and it will improve performance. `document` is not really optimal here
$(this).replaceWith('<span class="officeapprovalspan">wero<span>');
share|improve this answer
    
No, as you use it, the on method will not attach events on elements that doesn't exist yet. For that to work you have to use the delegate syntax, and attach it to a parent element that already exists. –  Guffa Apr 23 '12 at 21:40
    
It seems so, I updated the post, thanks @Guffa –  Tronix117 Apr 23 '12 at 21:59

spanclickhandler returns a jQuery object, $('.officeapprovalspan') in this case. You need to either create a separate function or use event namescapes.

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Can you just do this:

$(this).replaceWith('<span class="officeapprovalspan">wero<span>').click(spanclickhandler);
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