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I am still new with C and I am trying to empty a 2d char array. Here is the declaration:

char arg_array = (char**)calloc(strlen(buf), sizeof (char**));
for(i = 0; i<(strlen(buf)); i++)
{
    arg_array[i] = (char*) calloc (strlen(buf), sizeof(char*));
}

Here is where I try to empty it:

void make_empty(char **arg_array)
{
     int i;
     for(i = 0; i <= BUFSIZ; i++)
     {
        arg_array[i][0] = '\0';
     }
     return;
}

Any help is appreciated

So, am I doing it right because this seems to give me segfaults when I try to add data to the array again and then print it?

Empty is just to have it empty - how can I explain more? lol

share|improve this question
    
you are just modifying the first element of each sub-array... and what is "empty" in your context?? –  UmNyobe Apr 23 '12 at 22:30
    
Have another variable like j, then create an inner for loop with it from 0 to columnSize - 1. Change BUFSIZE to rowSize - 1 –  mert Apr 23 '12 at 22:40
    
You can empty a char * by making it's first character the null plug. (Even a noob such as myself knows that.) Here I am assuming that you can apply this to 2d arrays but when I "empty" it using this function and try to reuse it I get seg faults. –  beyondavatars Apr 23 '12 at 22:41
    
It is not true that you empty the char* by putting '\0' on the first position of string to which it points. It only makes functions like printf treat it like empty, zero-length string. If it comes to your problem, char** is only a pointer to array-the program won't know what is the number of rows and columns of your array so you will have to pass them to your function separately. Also, as somebody said before, you don't have to empty 2d array if you calloced it because calloc fills it with zeros. –  Wookie88 Apr 23 '12 at 22:46
    
wookie88 - can I apply this to a 2d array? –  beyondavatars Apr 23 '12 at 22:48

2 Answers 2

There is no need to empty it. Often in C, memory allocation is done with malloc which simply returns to you a block of memory which is deemed owned by the caller. When calloc is called, as well as returning you a block of memory, the memory is guaranteed to be initialized to 0. This means for all intents and purposes it is already 'empty'.

Also I'm not quite sure if your code does what you are intending. Let me explain what it does at the moment:

char arg_array = (char**)calloc(strlen(buf), sizeof (char**));

This line is simply wrong. In C, there is no need to cast pointers returned from calloc because they are of type void *, which is implicitly casted to any other pointer type. In this case, you are storing it in a char type which makes no sense. If you do this:

char ** arg_array = calloc(strlen(buf), sizeof (char**));

Then it allocates an array of pointers of strlen(buf) length. So if buf is "hello" then you have now allocated an array which can store 5 pointers.

for(i = 0; i<(strlen(buf)); i++)
{
  arg_array[i] = calloc (strlen(buf), sizeof(char*));
}

Again, I have removed the redundant cast. What this does is populates the array allocated earlier. Each index of the array now points to a char string of strlen(buf) * sizeof(char *) length. This is probably not what you want.


Your question is more clear to me now. It appears you want to remove the strings after populating them. You can do it two ways:

  • Either free each of the pointers and allocate more space later as you did before
  • Or set the first character of each of the strings to a null character

To free the pointers:

for(i = 0; i<(strlen(buf)); i++)
{
  free(arg_array[i]);
}

To set the first character of each string to a null character:

for(i = 0; i<(strlen(buf)); i++)
{
  arg_array[i][0] = '\0';
}

That is the same code as what you have originally and should be fine.


As proof, the following code will run without errors:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void)
{
    char *  buf       = "hello";
    char ** arg_array = calloc(strlen(buf), sizeof (char**));
    unsigned int i;


    for(i = 0; i < strlen(buf); i++) {
        arg_array[i] = calloc(strlen(buf),
                sizeof(char *));
    }

    for(i = 0; i < strlen(buf); i++) {
        arg_array[i][0] = '\0';
    }

    for(i = 0; i < strlen(buf); i++) {
        free(arg_array[i]);
    }


    free(arg_array);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

If your code is segfaulting, the problem is coming from somewhere else. Did you overwrite the arg_array variable? Are you sure BUFSIZE is equal to strlen(buf)?

share|improve this answer
    
I fill it up with words and I need to empty it again. I believe I stated this in the question. So this answer was perhaps not what I was looking for. –  beyondavatars Apr 23 '12 at 22:47
    
shouldn't you be using sizeof(char *) and sizeof(char) (which is 1 so unnecessary) for the loops instead of sizeof(char **) and sizeof(char *)? –  twain249 Apr 23 '12 at 23:03
    
@twain249: Yes, I did not correct this. sizeof(char **) is used where OP probably meant sizeof(char *). However, both the values are equal. sizeof(char) is not used anywhere in my answer. –  Mike Kwan Apr 23 '12 at 23:06
    
@MikeKwan I meant you have arg_array[i] = calloc (strlen(buf), sizeof(char*)); that should either by sizeof(char) or simply 1. –  twain249 Apr 23 '12 at 23:08
    
@twain249: Yep, I noted this is probably not what he intended in my answer already. –  Mike Kwan Apr 23 '12 at 23:09

Try this:

void make_empty(char **arg_array, int rows, int cols)
    {
     int i,j;
     for(i = 0; i <rows; i++)
     {
       for(j=0; j<cols;j++)
       {
          arg_array[i][j] = '\0';
       }
     }
    return;
    }

Where rows is number of rows and cols number of cols of your array.

P.S. This function clears the whole array as you should always do. As I commented before, putting '\0' as a first char in string does not clear the whole row, it only makes the rest of it ,,invisible'' for functions like printf. Check this link for more information: http://cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/printf/

share|improve this answer
1  
memset would be a far easier alternative here. –  Mike Kwan Apr 23 '12 at 22:57
    
I know, but I think with this example it will be easier for the author of question to understand what he misunderstood (see comments below question) ;). –  Wookie88 Apr 23 '12 at 23:02

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