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I have an object that has to be of different types internally, but that I always want to return as a string. So I declared the object as 'id' and wrote a getter method that always returns NSString*. Everything is working as it should, and XCode is complaining "Type of property 'X' does not match type of accessor 'setX:'" as expected. Since I do want this behaviour though, does anybody know how to tell XCode that I do, in fact, want this, and would rather not see this warning all the time? Kind of like the "__unused" directive for unused variables?

Thank you! Max

Edit: Here's the code

.h

@property (strong,nonatomic) id wert;
- (void) setWert:(NSString *)value;
- (NSString *) wert;

.m

 @synthesize wert;

- (void) setWert:(NSString *)value
{
        wert = value;
}

- (NSString *) wert
{
        return wert;
}
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Can you post the code you are having problems with? –  Jim Apr 23 '12 at 22:45
    
I can't seem to recreate this error. Can you post code and the exact error message? –  joerick Apr 23 '12 at 22:49
    
added code sample in the original post. The error message is "Type of property 'wert' does not match type of accessor 'setWert:'" –  Max Apr 23 '12 at 23:09
    
@Max I still can't recreate this. You might have to create a sample project and isolate the issue. Are you on the latest version of Xcode? –  joerick Apr 24 '12 at 9:34
    
@joerick thank you so much for your help! I've uploaded a sample project here: filedropper.com/test_22 –  Max Apr 24 '12 at 11:11

2 Answers 2

The problem lies in these lines:

@interface TestClass : NSObject

@property (strong, nonatomic) id wert;

- (void) setWert:(NSString *)value;
- (NSString *) wert;

@end

Essentially, the @property notation is shorthand for declaring the accessor methods (with some attributes, admittedly). So it makes no sense here to declare it first as an id, and then as an NSString. Decide on the type that you want to expose for wert, and use that for the property declaration. I'd suggest:

@interface TestClass : NSObject

@property (strong, nonatomic) id wert;

@end

Additionally, in the .m, you first @synthesize the property, then override the getter and setter. This means the only thing you're getting from the @synthesize is the instance variable.

You can declare instance variables in the @implementation block too. This would be a good place for you to declare the internal type:

@implementation TestClass
{
    NSString *wert;
}

But then if you're happy for other classes to call setWert: with anything other than NSString, you shouldn't change the type declaration for the setter. To do so would be assuming that value is an NSString. So your accessors should look like this:

- (void) setWert:(id)value
{
    // store wert as an NSString
}

- (id) wert
{
    // return wert as the original type
}

@end
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Thanks a lot, I did misunderstand what @property did. Even so, declaring the instance variable as id wert in @implementation leads to a crash with 'NSInvalidArgumentException', reason: '-[__NSCFString stringValue]: unrecognized selector sent to instance...'. I don't know why this doesn't work, but the way before did. As for the accessor methods, value is always string, and to the outside world, wert is supposed to look like a NSString, but inside, it is and should be a bunch of different objects - from NSInteger to NSDate. Maybe that is not ideal but why did it work before then? –  Max Apr 24 '12 at 17:40
    
Okay, looks like I had it the wrong way around then. Declare the property as NSString (including the setters and getters) and then the instance variable as id. As for your crash, this is a different issue, you must have changed your logic somewhere. –  joerick Apr 25 '12 at 8:33
    
That doesn't work either, then I'm getting errors elsewhere in the getter method: "No visible @interface for 'NSString' declares the selector 'decimalValue'". It's a bit weird. Maybe I should just live with the warnings, but I really appreciate your help! –  Max Apr 25 '12 at 11:46
    
Sounds like you're still mixing up the two types... –  joerick Apr 25 '12 at 13:40
    
Probably, but where? I think I'll just leave it, after all, it's working. Thanks for your help, joerick! –  Max Apr 26 '12 at 11:08

setting an NSString * to and id typed property wont cause an warning, but setting an id typed var to a NSString * property will... you can resolve with a typecast...

id someVar = @"string";
someObject.setStringProperty = (NSString *)someVar;
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