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I want to order my methods in my python class but I don't know what is the correct order.

When I extract methods in Eclipse with pydev then Eclipse puts the extracted method on top of the modified method. But this puts the lower level details before the higher level details. According to Uncle Bob I should do the opposite so that my code reads like the headlines of a news paper. When I program Java I just follow his advice.

What is the best practice for Python?

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5  
There isn't a best practice. Do what makes the most sense - important stuff near the top is a good idea, and consistency is generally a good thing. PEP-8 doesn't mention this, and if it were to be set in stone, that's where it would be. –  Lattyware Apr 23 '12 at 23:04
3  
And even PEP8 isn't always set in stone. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 23 '12 at 23:06
1  
I usually do it by group on the functionality (get, set, etc) –  CppLearner Apr 23 '12 at 23:11

2 Answers 2

There is no one correct order. Pick a system and stick with it. The one I use is:

class SomeClass(object):
    def __magic_methods__(self):
        "magic methods first, usually in alphabetical order"
    def _private_method(self):
        "worker methods next, also in alpha order"
    def a_method(self):
        "then normal methods, also in alpha order"
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What's your preference for staticmethods, class variables, and @property decorated methods? –  John Mee Sep 13 '12 at 4:56
    
@JohnMee: class variables I put before anything else; my folding method hides the @staticmethod, @classmethod, @property, and any other @decorator lines so I use the type of the method to determine where it goes (with the exception that properties tend to go between _private_methods and normal_methods). –  Ethan Furman Sep 13 '12 at 16:22
    
So if the order basically goes from very private "magic" methods to private to normal methods, does that mean @classmethods come next (@classmethod def a_class_method(cls)) then @staticmethods (@staticmethod def a_static_method())? At least that's the policy as I understand it... (without my IDE folding anything because I don't like that) –  Kawu Jul 23 '14 at 8:19

I do something similar to @Ethan that I saw in Django's source, where the main difference is big "############" block comments to delimit the areas. For example,

class SomeClass(object):
    #################
    # Magic Methods #
    #################
    def __magic_methods__(self):
        "magic methods first"

    ##################
    # Public Methods #
    ##################
    def a_method(self):
        "then normal methods, in order of importance"

    ###################
    # Private Methods #
    ###################
    def _private_method(self):
        "then worker methods, grouped by importance or related function"

Obviously this is less useful for smaller classes.

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But I can see that they're magic, public or private. I actively dislike such blocks of comments, myself; I can look at the code folded if I want to see a list of them all. Having a comment above a particular block of functionality-related methods is something I'd do, but for this type of comment--that's what the method names tell me. –  Chris Morgan Apr 23 '12 at 23:38
    
Again, I only do this for larger classes. I find it's easy to confuse magic methods with semi-private () and name-mangled (_) methods. –  Matt Luongo Apr 24 '12 at 15:03

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