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I´ll try to be short as the question has not been very answered. For the long explanation, go after this briefing.

I will show what Im trying to do. Something like this (infering the incoming type from the constructor in order to use it in another method getLeaderHerd as a return type)... :

public class ZooCage{

    private CageFamily<T> inhabitants;  

    public <T>ZooCage(CageFamily<T> herd) {
        this.inhabitants=herd;      
    }

    public T getHerdLeader() {
        return inhabitants.getLeader();
    }   
}

or this

public class ZooCage{

    private (Type) T;   

    public ZooCage(CageFamily<T> herd) {
        this.T=T;       
    }

    public T getHerdLeader() {
        return inhabitants.getLeader();
    }   
}

so I could call from Main something like:

ZooCage cage = new ZooCage(new CageFamily<Lion>()); //Imagine new CageFamily its not empty
Lion leader = cage.getHerdLeader();

Even if its not possible, why should I think that that is not reasonable to feature? Its type safe if the compiler is intelligent and less redundant that typifiing the class ZooCage which is not necessary

I,m assessing using Generics for a particular behavior. I managed to get it work but I don,t understand why cant I infer the type from the arg. So I created this example which runs ok without warnings with the purpose of simplifying the actual architecture.

( Look directly the last 2-lines snippet for a fast briefing )

Suppose I got these two classes. The target one:

package Zoo;
import Zoo.Main.CageFamily;
import Zoo.Main.Vertebrate;

public class ZooCage<T extends Vertebrate>{

    private CageFamily<T> inhabitants;  

    public ZooCage(CageFamily<T> herd) {
        this.inhabitants=herd;      
    }

    public T getHerdLeader() {
        return inhabitants.getLeader();
    }   
}

Imagine that in cages there can only be Vertebrates (Insects/aracnids are not to big ang giant quids/octopus needs aquatic medium)

The other one class, Main.java

package Zoo;
import java.util.ArrayList;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args){
        new Main().test();
    }

    public void test(){
        CageFamily<Lion> lionsHerd = new CageFamily<Lion>();
        lionsHerd.add(new Lion("Simba"));
        lionsHerd.add(new Lion("Nala"));

        CageFamily<Bear> bearsHerd = new CageFamily<Bear>();
        bearsHerd.add(new Bear("Yogi"));
        bearsHerd.add(new Bear("Boo-boo"));

        ZooCage<Lion> cageLions = new ZooCage<Lion>(lionsHerd);     
        ZooCage<Bear> cageBears = new ZooCage<Bear>(bearsHerd);

        for (ZooCage<?> cage : new ZooCage[]{cageLions,cageBears} ) 
           System.out.println("The leader is "+ cage.getHerdLeader());

    }

    public interface Vertebrate{
        public String toString();
        public int numBones();
    }
    public class Lion implements Vertebrate{
        private String name;
        public Lion (String name){this.name=name;}
        public String toString(){return name + " (who has "+numBones()+" bones)";}
        public int numBones(){return 345;}
    }
    public class Bear implements Vertebrate{
        private String name;
        public Bear (String name){this.name=name;}      
        public String toString(){return name + " (who has "+numBones()+" bones)";}
        public int numBones(){return 658;}
    }
    public class CageFamily<E extends Vertebrate> extends ArrayList<E>{
        final static long serialVersionUID = 1L;
        public E getLeader(){
             return get(0); //Let,s assume the first added is the leader
        }
    }
}

This compiles OK and prints

The leader is Simba (who has bones)
The leader is Yogi (who has bones)

What Im wondering is: Is there any way (only using types/generics and without supressingWarnings nor castings) to avoid the typification of the class ZooCage as a whole? I tried thousand ways to get the inference of the type from ZooCage,s constructor arg to the return value for getHerdLeader. It should be not necessary typifying ZooCage when his constructor comes with the expected type. Seems redundant and makes you having to know beforehand the type!

Thank you very much to all who can help!

share|improve this question
1  
what part, exactly, are you trying to avoid? What do you mean by "avoid the typification"? –  Louis Wasserman Apr 24 '12 at 0:46
    
Avoid to specify <T> in ZooCage definition of the class so I have to use it as ZooCage<param> = new ZooCage<param>. Id like to infer the return type of getHerdLeader from the incoming type in the constructor. I mean return T which is the T incoming with the CageFamily arg, and forgeting the class definition of generic. –  user1352530 Apr 24 '12 at 0:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Java 7 lets you do ZooCage<Type> = new ZooCage<>(argument). That feature is new in Java 7, though, and isn't available in earlier versions of Java.

Alternately, a traditional way of getting around Java 6's lack of type inference is to write a factory method

public static <T> ZooCage<T> newZooCage() {
  return new ZooCage<T>();
}

and then newZooCage() gets its type automatically inferred, since even Java 5 had type inference for methods -- just not for constructors.

share|improve this answer
    
But Id like to not specify type in the call for ZooCage anywhere. Im pretty sure there must be someway of bringing the T on public ZooCage(CageFamily<T> herd) { this.inhabitants=herd; } to the T on public T getHerdLeader() { return inhabitants.getLeader(); } –  user1352530 Apr 24 '12 at 0:58
    
FYI there is sort of a bug (that maybe fixed now) with doing the static factory method in Java 5. ie this will not work "ZooCage<Blah> b = ZooCage.newZooCage();" ... You have to do ZooCage<Blah> b = ZooCage<Blah>.newZooCage(); However the former will work with Eclipse JDT. –  Adam Gent Apr 24 '12 at 0:59
    
Thanks, but I think Im not good exposing the situation. I want to spell ZooCage without generics. I had to do it for compiling the example, but Im looking for a solution for writing ZooCage a = new ZooCage( and getting the return type on getHerdLeader exclusively from the type of the CageFamily<T> passed as argument in the constructor. The written code is already working, so any solution that needs parametrize ZooCage with <> is not valid for me sorry –  user1352530 Apr 24 '12 at 1:06
    
There is no solution in Java that does what you're describing. The type information from construction time isn't preserved -- the only type information it can use to figure out the return type of getHerdLeader is the type of the ZooCage -- not anything from when the ZooCage was constructed. –  Louis Wasserman Apr 24 '12 at 1:14
1  
@AdamGent: ...Really? ZooCage<Blah>.newZooCage() has never worked; the type arguments are always on the other side of the .. Certainly Java 6 almost always lets you get away with ZooCage.newZooCage() without type arguments, though -- I'd be surprised if Java 5 didn't let you do that. –  Louis Wasserman Apr 24 '12 at 1:19

Java does not support type inference.

If your interested in that you should look at Scala.

In Java 7 you can ommit the type between < > on the right hand side. In Java 6 you can do it with static methods with Guava. Java 8 may/will have literals (or at least last time a checked) so that might help also.

I don't agree that any of these are true type inference (see comments below).

share|improve this answer
1  
Java does support type inference: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/… It just wasn't supported for constructors until 7 like you noted. –  Paul Bellora Apr 24 '12 at 3:28
    
@PaulBellora They (Oracle) are taken some serious liberties on what it is to have type inference. True type inference allows you to not declare the type in both the method arguments, and left hand side declaration. IMHO Java (7) does not even come close to having C#'s, Scala, F#, Ocaml or Haskell's type inferencing. –  Adam Gent Apr 24 '12 at 14:31
    
Yes I can infer actually the incoming type in Java 6. The problem is that I can´t propagate it outside the scope of the constructor. If I try to assign it to a class´ private var T, then obviously it complains because T is not defined on the scope of the whole class (ZooCage<Type>) –  user1352530 Apr 24 '12 at 16:44
    
I don't even know what "infer" means anymore. Everybody is using it differently then how I would. –  Adam Gent Apr 25 '12 at 0:14
    
Well I don´t know exactly, I think the literal meaning is guessing something from another thing, so in that case I would say handling and using one type according to the unknown parametrized incoming type. –  user1352530 Apr 25 '12 at 10:40

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