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I am trying to replicate the functionality that Dribbble.com does with detecting the predominant colors in an Image. In the image below you can see a screenshot from Dribbble.com that shows the 8 predominant colors in the image to the left. Here is the actual page in the image http://dribbble.com/shots/528033-Fresh-Easy?list=following

I need to be able to do this in PHP, once I get the colors I need I will save them to a database so the processing does not need to be run on every page load.

After some research on how to get these colors out of an Image, some people said you simply examine an image pixel by pixel and then save the colors that occur the most. Other say there is more to it and that getting the colors that exist the most frequent won't give the desired affect. They say you need to Quantize the image/colors (I am lost at this point).

In the image below the Dribble shot below is a Javascript library that does the same thing, that page can be viewed here http://lokeshdhakar.com/projects/color-thief/

Viewing the source of that page I can see there is a Javascript file named quantize.js and the results are really good. So I am hoping to be able to do what that Javascript library does but with PHP and GD/ImageMagick

enter image description here


I had found this function that will return the colors and count in an Image with PHP but the results are different from the Javascript version above and the Dribble results

/**
 * Returns the colors of the image in an array, ordered in descending order, where the keys are the colors, and the values are the count of the color.
 *
 * @return array
 */
function Get_Color()
{
    if (isset($this->image))
    {
        $PREVIEW_WIDTH    = 150;  //WE HAVE TO RESIZE THE IMAGE, BECAUSE WE ONLY NEED THE MOST SIGNIFICANT COLORS.
        $PREVIEW_HEIGHT   = 150;
        $size = GetImageSize($this->image);
        $scale=1;
        if ($size[0]>0)
        $scale = min($PREVIEW_WIDTH/$size[0], $PREVIEW_HEIGHT/$size[1]);
        if ($scale < 1)
        {
            $width = floor($scale*$size[0]);
            $height = floor($scale*$size[1]);
        }
        else
        {
            $width = $size[0];
            $height = $size[1];
        }
        $image_resized = imagecreatetruecolor($width, $height);
        if ($size[2]==1)
        $image_orig=imagecreatefromgif($this->image);
        if ($size[2]==2)
        $image_orig=imagecreatefromjpeg($this->image);
        if ($size[2]==3)
        $image_orig=imagecreatefrompng($this->image);
        imagecopyresampled($image_resized, $image_orig, 0, 0, 0, 0, $width, $height, $size[0], $size[1]); //WE NEED NEAREST NEIGHBOR RESIZING, BECAUSE IT DOESN'T ALTER THE COLORS
        $im = $image_resized;
        $imgWidth = imagesx($im);
        $imgHeight = imagesy($im);
        for ($y=0; $y < $imgHeight; $y++)
        {
            for ($x=0; $x < $imgWidth; $x++)
            {
                $index = imagecolorat($im,$x,$y);
                $Colors = imagecolorsforindex($im,$index);
                $Colors['red']=intval((($Colors['red'])+15)/32)*32;    //ROUND THE COLORS, TO REDUCE THE NUMBER OF COLORS, SO THE WON'T BE ANY NEARLY DUPLICATE COLORS!
                $Colors['green']=intval((($Colors['green'])+15)/32)*32;
                $Colors['blue']=intval((($Colors['blue'])+15)/32)*32;
                if ($Colors['red']>=256)
                $Colors['red']=240;
                if ($Colors['green']>=256)
                $Colors['green']=240;
                if ($Colors['blue']>=256)
                $Colors['blue']=240;
                $hexarray[]=substr("0".dechex($Colors['red']),-2).substr("0".dechex($Colors['green']),-2).substr("0".dechex($Colors['blue']),-2);
            }
        }
        $hexarray=array_count_values($hexarray);
        natsort($hexarray);
        $hexarray=array_reverse($hexarray,true);
        return $hexarray;

    }
    else die("You must enter a filename! (\$image parameter)");
}

So I am asking if anyone knows how I can do such a task with PHP? Possibly something exist already that you know of or any tips to put me a step closer to doing this would be appreciated

share|improve this question
    
    
@aSeptik it looks to be doing the same as the code I have posted already –  jasondavis Apr 24 '12 at 0:50
    
do you have tried to search google for "php get color palette from image" i founded a lot of results; just asking... –  aSeptik Apr 24 '12 at 0:52
2  
@aSeptik Yes I have, 95% of them are the same method I have posted (color counting) I am looking for the better method of quantizing the image to get the colors like Dribble and the Javascript library I posted above do –  jasondavis Apr 24 '12 at 0:57
    
Quantization does not solve the problem either (the clustering, like Alex wrote in his answer). The reason you cannot port the JS code to PHP 1:1 is that they use the canvas element - the evaluation therefore happens on the frontend... –  Chris May 14 '13 at 14:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is exactly what you are looking for in PHP : https://github.com/thephpleague/color-extractor

Example :

require 'vendor/autoload.php';

use League\ColorExtractor\Client as ColorExtractor;

$client = new ColorExtractor;

$image = $client->loadPng('./some/image.png');

// Get the most used color hexadecimal codes from image.png
$palette = $image->extract();
share|improve this answer

The page you linked to has a link to the source code on GitHub so if you want to know exactly how they are doing you could replicate their source in PHP.

The big difference between how they are doing it and how you are doing it, is that they are using clustering to find the color. Instead of rounding the color when they store it, they are storing all of the raw colors in an array. Then they loop through this array until they find a cluster that has the highest ratio of points in the cluster to number of colors in the cluster. The center point of this is the most common color. The palette is then defined by the next highest sets of clusters, with some logic to prevent near complete overlap of the clusters.

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