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A palindrome is a string that reads the same forwards and backwards. Examples of palindromes include "lol", "abba", "radar", and "pickle elkcip". Indicate whether or not it works under all circumstances described in the following docstring: '''Return True if string s is a palindrome and return False otherwise.'''

def palindrome2(s):
    n = len(s)
    pal = True
    for i in range(n/2):
        if s[i] == s[n-i-1]:
            pal = True
        else:
            pal = False
    return pal

I don't get why this function wouldn't work. To me, it seems as if the function works. Apparently, the booleans are misused but I don't get how the booleans above are not used properly. Can someone please explain this to me?

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Did you run the programme with various types of test input? There are even frameworks to make that easier. –  Marcin Dec 19 '12 at 15:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The way the body of the loop is coded the values of pal may change between True and False repeatedly depending on whether a given pair of characters happen to match or not during that particular iteration.

Better to check for inequality, set your Boolean variable pal to False and drop out of the loop immediately then.

Something like this:

def palindrome2(s):
    n = len(s)
    pal = True

    for i in range(n/2)
        if s[i] != s[n-i-1]: # the moment it's false
           pal = False       # set pal and
           break             # drop out of the loop

    return pal

alternatively, without using a Boolean variable:

    ...
    for i in range(n/2)
        if s[i] != s[n-i-1]: # the moment it's false
           return False      # exit the function by returning False

    return True  # otherwise return True
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1  
Or, you know, since it's in a function... –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 24 '12 at 1:20
    
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams Are you referring to the 2nd alternate solution - yes, that's a clean option, I agree. The first is closest to the original code which is why it's there. –  Levon Apr 24 '12 at 1:26
1  
Note: if you are running under Python 3, you'll need n//2 in the range –  rbanffy Apr 24 '12 at 13:39

For fun, you could also try the much simpler:

def palindrome(s):
  return s[::-1] == s

(exercise left to the reader regarding how it works)

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1  
You are missing return. –  Akavall Apr 24 '12 at 1:27
    
@Akavall Good call :) (fixed) –  ulmangt Apr 24 '12 at 1:28

You always check every single character. You need to return as soon as you know the result definitively.

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@ulmangt's solution is very clever, but I'd go with a less enigmatic:

def palindrome(s):
    return all(( s[i] == s[-(i+1)] for i in range(len(s)/2) ))

At least it does half as many comparisons ;-)

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Elegant. +1 for optimizing the number of comparisons. (However in my tests this took 3.5x as long as @ulmangt's implementation.) –  LarsH Jan 3 '13 at 21:00
    
You can also go with not(any(( s[i] != s[-(i+1)] for i in range(len(s)/2) ))) and you'll avoid some comparisons when the candidate is not a palindrome. –  rbanffy Jan 14 '13 at 19:23
    
Interesting... that's not a list nor a set comprehension... what is it? And how does it avoid some comparisons? –  LarsH Jan 14 '13 at 19:43
    
Ah, that's using a generator object ... cool. And any() will short-circuit as soon as it finds a True. –  LarsH Jan 14 '13 at 22:11

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