Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

trying to use the following code to evaluate a triple integral which is a function of q,u. getting the error,

Warning: Maximum function count exceeded; singularity likely. 
In quad at 107
In test1>Inner at 12
In test1>@(x)Inner(x) at 5
In quad at 76
In test1 at 5

Does anyone know what's wrong with this code?

function [r] = test1(q,u)
b = u;
r = zeros(1);
for i = 1 : length(q);
    r(i) = quad(@(x)Inner(x),-2,q);
end;


function [w] = Inner(k)
w = zeros(1);
for i = 1 : length(k);
    w(i) = quad(@(n)InnerIntegral(n).*unifpdf(k(i)-n,-1,1),0,k(i)-1,k(i)+1);
end;



function [y] = InnerIntegral(n)
y = zeros(1);
for i = 1 : length(n);
    y(i) = quad(@(m)unifpdf(n(i)-m, -b, b).*unifpdf(m,-b,b), n(i)-b,n(i)+b);
end;
end
end
end
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you define multiple functions like this, each function's end statement must precede the next call to function. Currently, it looks like this is one giant function with a subfunction called Inner and that subfunction has yet another subfunction called InnerIntegral. So test1 is trying to call Inner, but `Inner's definition doesn't occur until later inside of the definition of test1.

share|improve this answer
    
that makes sense, but then in the case how do I pass the variable $b$ among the functions? I didn't want to end them because it seemed that would allow the variable b to be global in scope. –  Red Rover Apr 24 '12 at 2:50
    
This is one annoyance of Matlab. One easy fix is to make a second parameter b to each of the second two functions, and then change the calls such that you pass b to them directly. It is probably also just easier to manage if you save each of these in different .m files, with names that match the function names. Make them take more inputs if needed. –  Mr. F Apr 24 '12 at 2:53

I was having the same problem and then I came across a solution which worked or me.

Try using quadgk(Function,lowerlimit,upperlimit) instead of quad(Function,lowerlimit,upperlimit)

hth

share|improve this answer

the problem is in :

function [w] = Inner(k)
w = zeros(1);
for i = 1 : length(k);
    w(i) = quad(@(n)InnerIntegral(n).*unifpdf(k(i)-n,-1,1),0,k(i)-1,k(i)+1);
end

the way it's set-up: w(i) = quad(@(n)fcc(n),0,k(i)-1 , k(i)+1);

the last value of quad is set as the tolerance. I think you want to get rid of the 0 term:

w(i) = quad(@(n)InnerIntegral(n).*unifpdf(k(i)-n,-1,1),k(i)-1,k(i)+1);
share|improve this answer
    
This is a good catch, but is unlikely to cause the error mentioned in the OP. The tolerance won't accept negative values without error, so it's safe to assume here that the mistaken tolerance, k(i) + 1 would be larger than 1. Thus, it would be a ridiculously lax tolerance and the quad function should return crude, inaccurate numbers... but it should not cause a maximum function evaluations sort of error. –  Mr. F Apr 24 '12 at 2:58
    
while you make a good point about the function call (he is building, calling then destroying anonymous functions...), the problem is in fact related to the tolerance. Try it yourself –  Rasman Apr 24 '12 at 4:18
    
I did try it in Octave. Giving a very large number for tolerance doesn't cause the function to hit max iterations. I could only understand this if you were giving a very small number for tolerance, requiring lots of iterations to try to reach an impossible precision. But that's not the case. –  Mr. F Apr 24 '12 at 4:29
    
Here I quote from the Mathworks documentation for quad() " Larger values of tol result in fewer function evaluations and faster computation, but less accurate results." –  Mr. F Apr 24 '12 at 4:31
    
I think your missing the point: the tolerance parameter can in fact be negative, which will provoke the warning cf. quad(@(t)t,0,1,-1) 2) –  Rasman Apr 24 '12 at 4:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.