Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My signal handler looks like:

volatile sig_atomic_t loop     = 1;

void handle()
{
    loop = 0;
}

And, I have a daemon which is like:

void _start_()
{
...
sa.sa_handler = handle;
sigaction(SIGINT, &sa, NULL);
while(loop)
{
   //add a line to a file
}
...
}

I want to stop the daemon, from another function like:

void _stop_()
{
    raise(SIGINT);
}

My idea is, somehow if the value of loop is 0, then the while would be evaluated as false, and the daemon exits. I am planning to use these two functions like:

_start_(); //daemon starts
//computation
_stop_() //daemon stops writing to the file. exits

How can I achieve this? The problem is I am not able to stop the daemon from _stop_().

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried to look at the program with a debugger? –  n.m. Apr 24 '12 at 3:06
    
Could you please elaborate? –  Sayan Apr 24 '12 at 3:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is the _stop() function called from a separate process from your daemon? If so, then it needs to know the ID of the process to signal. Normal practice is that the daemon writes its process ID to a file (a PID file) which can the be read by the process that stops the daemon.

share|improve this answer
    
I have updated the question. The _start_() function is a daemon, and the _stop_() function tries to stop the daemon by raising a signal. –  Sayan Apr 24 '12 at 3:33
    
"Normal practice is that the daemon writes its process ID to a file (a PID file) which can the be read by the process that stops the daemon." - so are you intending that I could read the pid, and then from _stop_() I would just need to read and then kill the pid? –  Sayan Apr 24 '12 at 3:35
    
"I would just need to read and then kill the pid?" Yes. –  Rich Drummond Apr 24 '12 at 3:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.