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I'm trying to get something like this to work by passing a function pointer. I know you can just pass a pointer of the first class to the second and get the second to fire a member function of the first class through the pointer. But I don't want the second class to rely on knowing who the first class is. This is more like coding style i'm looking for to achieve this. Thanks

//////////////////////////////////////////////////
class Second
{
public:
    Second::Second(void (*SecondTriggered)(void));
};

Second::Second(void (*SecondTriggered)(void))
{
    SecondTriggered();
}


//////////////////////////////////////////////////
class First
{
public: 
    First::First();
    void SecondTriggered();
    Second *second;
};

First::First(){
        printf("first class was created"); 
    second = new Second(SecondTriggered);
}

void First::SecondTriggered(){
    printf("second class was created and responded"); 
}

/////////////////
int main()
{
    First *first = new First();
 } 

I get this error:

error C3867: 'First::SecondTriggered': function call missing argument list; 
use '&First::SecondTriggered' to create a pointer to member

Any ideas.

share|improve this question
    
    
Make Second class able to fire a member function of First class, but without sending a pointer to the whole class over.. just the function. –  aquawicket Apr 24 '12 at 3:49
    
@dasblinkenlight Ah, didn't realize that had happened in the mean time. Have deleted my comment as well. –  smocking Apr 24 '12 at 12:51
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are trying to pass a non-static class member where a standalone function is expected. To do what you are attempting, you would have to do something like the following instead:

class Second
{
public:
    Second::Second(void (*SecondTriggered)(void*), void *arg);
};

Second::Second(void (*SecondTriggered)(void*), void *arg)
{
    SecondTriggered(arg);
}


//////////////////////////////////////////////////
class First
{
public: 
    First::First();
    static void SecondTriggered(void *arg);
    Second *second;
    void DoSomething();
};

First::First(){
    printf("first class was created"); 
    second = new Second(&SecondTriggered, this);
}

void First::SecondTriggered(void *arg){
    printf("second class was created and responded"); 
    static_cast<First*>(arg)->DoSomething();
}

void First::DoSomething(){
    printf("first class did something");
}

/////////////////
int main()
{
    First *first = new First();
 } 
share|improve this answer
    
Ok. this is working great. But now I can't access any members that aren't static. Can it be done with a non-static SecondTriggered() or can SecondTriggered() have access to non-static members? –  aquawicket Apr 24 '12 at 4:13
1  
Yes, you can access non-static members. First::SecondTriggered() is a member of First so it has access to all of First's members. The purpose of passing the arg parameter is specifically so you CAN access the non-static members. That is why I said you can typecast that parameter to a First* pointer when needed. I have updated my answer with an example. –  Remy Lebeau Apr 24 '12 at 4:26
    
I like this.. static_cast<First*>(arg)->DoSomething(); is the only extra that I have to do without telling Second who I am. Pretty much what I was looking for. Thanks Remy –  aquawicket Apr 24 '12 at 4:37
    
My answer shows you how you can do this without the static_cast<>()s. –  Johnsyweb Apr 26 '12 at 1:11
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You should read How do I implement a callback in C++? and pay particular attention to references to the Observer Pattern. If you have two such tightly-coupled classes then you probably want to re-think your design as testing them will soon become a nightmare.

That said, here is how to finish the implementation that you started...

#include <iostream>

class First;

// Typedefs make this much more readable: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/pointers-to-members.html#faq-33.5
typedef void (First::*SecondTriggeredCallback)(void);

// And macros make the call much more readable:  http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/pointers-to-members.html#faq-33.6
#define CALL_MEMBER_FN(object, ptrToMember) ((object).*(ptrToMember))

class Second
{
public:
    // You'll also need an *instance* of the First class
    Second(SecondTriggeredCallback SecondTriggered, First& first)
    {
        CALL_MEMBER_FN(first, SecondTriggered)();
    }
};

class First
{
private:
    Second *second;

public:
    First()
    {
        std::cout << "first class was created" << std::endl;
        second = new Second(&First::SecondTriggered, *this);
    }

    ~First()
    {
        delete second;
    }

    void SecondTriggered()
    {
        std::cout << "second class was created and responded" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    First first;
}

See it run!


Here's a version that removes the coupling by using templates:

#include <iostream>

// Macros make the call much more readable: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/pointers-to-members.html#faq-33.6
#define CALL_MEMBER_FN(object, ptrToMember) ((object).*(ptrToMember))
template <class T>
struct Second
{
    // Typedefs make this much more readable: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/pointers-to-members.html#faq-33.5
    typedef void (T::*SecondTriggeredCallback)(void);

    // You'll also need an *instance* of the "T" class
    Second(SecondTriggeredCallback SecondTriggered, T& t)
    {
        CALL_MEMBER_FN(t, SecondTriggered)();
    }
};

class First
{
public:
    First()
        :second(NULL)
    {
        std::cout << "first class was created" << std::endl;
        second = new Second<First>(&First::SecondTriggered, *this);
    }

    ~First()
    {
        delete second;
    }

    void SecondTriggered()
    {
        std::cout << "second class was created and responded" << std::endl;
    }

private:
    First(const First&);
    First& operator =(const First&);
    Second<First>* second;
};

int main()
{
    First first;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
very nice and clean, I like this to. Thanks –  aquawicket Jun 4 '12 at 1:26
    
very nicely put. –  rahman May 2 '13 at 7:17
1  
Thanks @rahman. This code could be reduced further by using smart pointers, of course. For example: ideone.com/129OJo –  Johnsyweb May 2 '13 at 9:46
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Keep in mind that pointers to member functions and function pointers are very different. You have to have an object to invoke the pointer to member function on. If you want to use a pointer to member function, the following code works (I am only showing the syntax to get your code to work. I would recommend understanding C++ concepts before using pointer to member functions):

#include <stdio.h>
//////////////////////////////////////////////////
class First; // Forward declaration needed

class Second
{
public:
    Second(void (First::*SecondTriggered)(void), First& f);
};

Second::Second(void (First::*SecondTriggered)(void), First& f)
{
    (f.*SecondTriggered)();
}


//////////////////////////////////////////////////
class First
{
public: 
    First();
    ~First() { delete second;} // Fix memory leak
    void SecondTriggered();
    Second *second;
};

First::First(){
    printf("first class was created\n"); // What are you using printf in C++? 
    second = new Second(&First::SecondTriggered, *this);
}

void First::SecondTriggered(){
    printf("second class was created and responded\n"); 
}

/////////////////
int main()
{
    First first; // No reason to use new here
} 

Please read this faq for more info.

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You may also consider passing a function object:

class t_func {
protected:
    t_func() {
    }

    virtual ~t_func() {
    }

public:
    virtual void operator()() = 0;
private:
    t_func(const t_func&) = delete;
    t_func& operator=(const t_func&) = delete;
};

class Second {
public:
    Second(t_func& func);
};

Second::Second(t_func& func) {
    func();
}

class First {
public:
    First();
private:
    void SecondTriggered();
    Second* second;
};

First::First() {
    printf("first class was created\n");

    class t_trigger : public t_func {
    public:
        t_trigger(First& pFirst) : t_func(), first(pFirst) {
        }

        virtual void operator()() {
            return first.SecondTriggered();
        }

    private:
        First& first;
    };

    t_trigger trig(*this);
    second = new Second(trig);
}

void First::SecondTriggered() {
    printf("second class was created and responded\n");
}

int main() {
    First* first = new First();

    delete first;
    return 0;
}
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