Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a data like this:

Re: Building A

Month
kWh
1
100
2
110
3
105


Re: Building B

Month
kWh
1
200
2
210
3
205

I would like to convert it to multiple text files one for each building. My plan is to:

  1. extract the values between the building delimiter line
  2. convert the lines into a table

For task (1) I tried to use the flip-flop operator like this:

while( <DATA> ) {
  next unless /^Re: Building A/ .. /^Re: Building B/;
  my $line = $_;
  print $line;
}

But it does not work because the above will show only the data for building A. The data is for multiple buildings (about 50 of them) so that I need to do this somewhat recursively. I have not started to do task (2).

Any help will be appreciated.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would do something like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my %buildings;

while (<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    $buildings{$1} = [] if /^Re: Building ([AB])/;
    push @{$buildings{$1}}, $_ if $_;
}

while (my ($building, $data) = each %buildings) {
    open(my $out, '>', "$building.txt") or die "Unable to open file for writing: $!\n";

    for my $i (1 .. $#$data / 2) {
        print $out sprintf "%s\t%s\n", $data->[$i*2-1], $data->[$i*2];
    }
    close $out;
}

A.txt:

Month   kWh
1       100
2       110
3       105

B.txt:

Month   kWh
1       200
2       210
3       205
share|improve this answer

I think you might do well with a table so I'll show you how to do both what you ask and what I think would be good.

$name = "";
$data = {}; 
open(IN, "build.txt");
foreach my $line (<IN>){
    if($line =~ /Re: (.*)\n/) { # get building name
        $name = $1;
        $name =~ s/ /_/;
        $data->{$name} = []; # link to empty array
    } else {
        # make a new list and return to a list
        @{$data->{$name}} = (@{$data->{$name}}, $line); # add line to current building data
    }
}
close IN;
#
# write on file for each
#
foreach my $name (keys %{$data}){
    open(OUT, ">$name.txt");
    foreach my $line (@{$data->{$name}}){
        print OUT $line;
    }
    close OUT;
}
#
# or write into one file as a table
#
open(OUT, ">tabledata.txt");
foreach my $name (keys %{$data}){
    # because the data was not filtered on import we filter it now
    my $flag = 0;
    my @data; 
    foreach my $line (@{$data->{$name}}){
        if($line =~ /kWh/) {
            $flag = 1;
        } elsif($line =~ /^\n$/){ # skip blanks
        } elsif($flag == 1) {     # skip the counters
            $flag++; 
        } elsif($flag > 1) {
            chomp($line);
            @data = (@data, $line);
            $flag = 1;
        }   
    }
    # print pretty rows
    my $format = "%20s" . ("%10d" x @data);
    print OUT sprintf($format, $name, @data) . "\n";

}
close OUT;      

This makes a file for each building with the building name. An example of the Building_A.txt is:

Month
kWh
1
100
2
110
3
105

And the table file is called tabledata.txt and looks like:

          Building_A       100       110       105
          Building_B       200       210       205
share|improve this answer

In python, I would parse the text file into a data structure and then output it using asciitables. Ideally you wouldn't really be manipulating strings directly but rather parsing, and then displaying as separate actions.

How exactly you do the parsing depends on factors such as how regular the format of the file is, and whether or not you need to be tolerant of mistakes or typos in the file.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.