Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a better way to find which X gives me the Y I am looking for in SciPy? I just began using SciPy and I am not too familiar with each function.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from scipy import interpolate

x = [70, 80, 90, 100, 110]
y = [49.7, 80.6, 122.5, 153.8, 163.0]
tck = interpolate.splrep(x,y,s=0)
xnew = np.arange(70,111,1)
ynew = interpolate.splev(xnew,tck,der=0)
plt.plot(x,y,'x',xnew,ynew)
plt.show()
t,c,k=tck
yToFind = 140
print interpolate.sproot((t,c-yToFind,k)) #Lowers the spline at the abscissa
share|improve this question
    
Can you elaborate on what you want to be better? Performance, accuracy, conciseness? –  Ryan Dec 4 '09 at 4:17
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The UnivariateSpline class in scipy makes doing splines much more pythonic.

x = [70, 80, 90, 100, 110]
y = [49.7, 80.6, 122.5, 153.8, 163.0]
f = interpolate.UnivariateSpline(x, y, s=0)
xnew = np.arange(70,111,1)

plt.plot(x,y,'x',xnew,f(xnew))

To find x at y then do:

yToFind = 140
yreduced = np.array(y) - yToFind
freduced = interpolate.UnivariateSpline(x, yreduced, s=0)
freduced.roots()

I thought interpolating x in terms of y might work but it takes a somewhat different route. It might be closer with more points.

share|improve this answer
1  
Wouldn't this require twice the amount of CPU calculations since are interpolating practically the same data set two times? –  JcMaco Jun 23 '09 at 11:29
    
@JcMaco, the first use of UnivariateSpline is just to make a pretty plot. The second usage is what actually gives the values. –  Theran Dec 9 '09 at 4:07
1  
Should that be freduced.roots() on the last line? –  Craig McQueen Sep 13 '10 at 7:06
    
Craig is right, can you correct it on your example as it's otherwise great! –  Mike Vella Jun 23 '11 at 23:50
    
Fixed the typo. Thanks Craig. –  ihuston Jun 27 '11 at 9:09
add comment

If all you need is linear interpolation, you could use the interp function in numpy.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd prefer spline interpolation. How would the interp function help me solve my problem more easily? –  JcMaco Jun 23 '09 at 11:23
    
Your question didn't specify what type of interpolation you needed -- if linear isn't good enough for your problem, then I don't think interp will help. –  Vicki Laidler Jun 24 '09 at 3:00
add comment

I may have misunderstood your question, if so I'm sorry. I don't think you need to use SciPy. NumPy has a least squares function.

#!/usr/bin/env python

from numpy.linalg.linalg import lstsq



def find_coefficients(data, exponents):
    X = tuple((tuple((pow(x,p) for p in exponents)) for (x,y) in data))
    y = tuple(((y) for (x,y) in data))
    x, resids, rank, s = lstsq(X,y)
    return x

if __name__ == "__main__":
    data = tuple((
        (1.47, 52.21),
        (1.50, 53.12),
        (1.52, 54.48),
        (1.55, 55.84),
        (1.57, 57.20),
        (1.60, 58.57),
        (1.63, 59.93),
        (1.65, 61.29),
        (1.68, 63.11),
        (1.70, 64.47),
        (1.73, 66.28),
        (1.75, 68.10),
        (1.78, 69.92),
        (1.80, 72.19),
        (1.83, 74.46)
    ))
    print find_coefficients(data, range(3))

This will return [ 128.81280358 -143.16202286 61.96032544].

>>> x=1.47 # the first of the input data
>>> 128.81280358 + -143.16202286*x + 61.96032544*(x**2)
52.254697219095988

0.04 out, not bad

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is finding which number will give me 52.21. Of course, there can be many solutions if the interpolation is quadratic (or higher power). –  JcMaco Nov 26 '09 at 18:27
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.