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JNA and DLLs are completely new territory for me... I have a custom DLL that has a function with this declaration:

int myfunc (const char*);

The dll compiles fine under MinGW with the following command:

>gcc -shared -omydll.dll mydll.c -lgdi32

However, loading it with JNA fails because it can't find the function within the DLL.

public interface mydll extends StdCallLibrary {
  mydll INSTANCE = (mydll)Native.loadLibrary("mydll", mydll.class);
  int myfunc (String arg);
  }

I did some research and it seems that this particular error has something to do with the calling procedure of the DLL functions. I've seen the __stdcall and the __cdecl procedures. I also saw that many DLL functions put __declspec(dllexport) in front of their function declarations/implementations (i have no idea what this means or what it does). So, since JNA seems to like the __stdcall procedure better, now my function looks like this:

__declspec(dllexport) int __stdcall myfunc (const char*);

Which looks super-complicated, but does no better than anything else i've tried. Using a HashMap to add the underscore prefix and the @4 suffix didn't work either:

mydll INSTANCE = (mydll)Native.loadLibrary("mydll", mydll.class, new HashMap () {{
  add("myfunc", "_myfunc@4");
  }});

The JNA documentation has been absolutely no help. I honestly have no idea what i'm doing anymore.

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What particular error are you getting, literally? –  Marko Topolnik Apr 24 '12 at 9:21
    
Have you set -Djna.library.path=<path location of your DLLs/libraries>? –  eee Apr 24 '12 at 13:18
    
You should provide the actual exception you are seeing, which will indicate where the problem lies. –  technomage Apr 24 '12 at 18:37
    
Follow Java conventions and name classes with a capital letter and mixed case (e.g. MyDLL.class). When you don't, it indicates you're new at Java and not really paying attention. –  technomage Apr 24 '12 at 18:38
    
Don't use stdcall unless you have a specific reason to do so. If you do use stdcall, you can avoid the function mapper by telling gcc to include undecorated names with "-Wl,add-stdcall-alias". –  technomage Apr 24 '12 at 18:40
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Turns out that i was building my DLL just fine, and JNA was finding my DLL just fine as well; i made an error in determining how the compiler mangled my symbols. Functions i named like myfunc were exported as myfunc@8 or myfunc@32 depending on how many bytes they took as arguments. Here's the code i used in my JNA project:

import java.util.*;
import com.sun.jna.*;
import com.sun.jna.win32.*;
//
public class Test
  {
  public interface mydll extends StdCallLibrary
    {
    mydll INSTANCE = Native.loadLibrary("mydll", mydll.class, new HashMap {{
      put("myfunc", "myfunc@8");
      //Other functions
      }});
    public int myfunc (long arg);
    //Other functions
    }
  //
  public static void main (String[] args)
    {
    System.out.println
      (mydll.INSTANCE.myfunc((long)0x23A3920F)); //Or whatever
    return 0;
    }
  }

My c code:

#include <windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>

__declspec(dllexport) int __stdcall myfunc (__int64);
/* Other functions */

__declspec(dllexport) int __stdcall myfunc (__int64 arg)
  {
  /* Whatever */
  return return_value;
  }

GCC was happy with just the -shared switch and linking against the proper libraries, like in my original question. I highly recommend downloading this tool so you can find out exactly what your function names are.

share|improve this answer
    
JNA provides a StdCallFunctionMapper to do what you've been doing manually, although I'd still recommend just dropping the std call and using the standard C calling convention instead. –  technomage Apr 26 '12 at 13:25
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Look at how the test library within JNA is built (native/Makefile). Following that example will indicate proper export signatures and calling conventions.

__declspec(dllexport) indicates that the function name should be exported.

__stdcall is what is used by most MS APIs; you normally have no reason to use it in your own code, as it only complicates linking with its mangling of names.

When actually compiling (and linking), you need to tell GCC that you're building a shared library. Simply naming the file "*.dll" isn't sufficient.

gcc -o mydll.dll -shared mydll.c 

You may need one or more -l<libname> options at the end depending on what native libraries you're accessing.

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I have been compiling with -shared but i forgot to put that in my post... –  nuju Apr 24 '12 at 21:49
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