Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AJAX, I get a fairly good grasp of what AJAX is. However, it looks like in order to learn it, I'd have to delve into multiple technologies at the same time to get any benefit out of it. So two questions:

  • What are resources that can help me understand/use AJAX?
  • What sort of website would benefit from AJAX?
share|improve this question
    
Similar discussion here: stackoverflow.com/questions/92786/… –  17 of 26 Sep 19 '08 at 15:41
    
Thanks! The link was quite helpful –  echoblaze Sep 19 '08 at 15:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are many libraries out there that can help you get benefit out of AJAX without learning about implementing callbacks, etc.

Are you using .NET? Look at http://ajax.asp.net. If you're not, then take a look at tools like qcodo for PHP, and learn about prototype.js, jquery, etc.

As far as websites that would benefit: Every web application ever. :) Anything you interact with by exchanging information, not just by clicking a link and reading an article.

share|improve this answer

If you aren't interested in the nitty gritty, you could use a higher-level library like JQuery or Prototype to create the underlying Javascript for you. The main benefit is a vastly more responsive user interface for web-based applications.

share|improve this answer

Every website can benefit from AJAX, but in my opinion the biggest benefit to AJAX comes in data entry sections - forms basically. I have done entire sites where the front end - the part the user sees had almost no AJAX functionality in it. All the AJAX stuff was in the administration control panel for assisting in (correct!) data entry.

There is nothing worse than submitting a form and getting back an error, using AJAX you can pretty much prevent this for everything but file uploads.

share|improve this answer

I find it easiest to just stay away from all the frameworks and other helpers and just do basic Javascript. This not only lets you understand what's going on under the covers, it also lets you do it in the simplest way possible. There's really not much to it. User the JS XML DOM objects to create an xml document client side. Sent it to the server with XMLHTTPRequest, and then process the result, again using the JS XML DOM objects. Start with something simple. Just try sending one piece of information to the server, and getting a small piece of information back.

share|improve this answer

The Mozilla documentation is good. Sites that benefit from it the most are ones that behave almost like a desktop application and need high interactivity. You can usually improve usability on almost any site by using it, however.

share|improve this answer

Ajax should be thought of as a means to alter some content on a page without reloading the entire page.

So when do you need to do this? Really only when you have some user interactions or form information that you want to keep intact while you change some content on the page.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.