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How can I write a regex that match this

123/456

123/456/?

but not this

123/456/

I want on the second / it must be followed by a ?.

For Example I would like it to match this

'123/456'.match(X) // return ['123/456']
'123/456/?'.match(X) // return ['123/456/?']
'123/456/'.match(X) // return null

Update

I missed to say one important thing. It must not end with '?', a string like '123/456/?hi' should also match

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1  
Could the numbers be different than 123 and 456? If yes, how long can they be? –  sp00m Apr 24 '12 at 7:19
    
@sp00m, yes, it can be any digits –  Codler Apr 24 '12 at 7:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can try this regex: \d{3}/\d{3}(/\?.*)?

It will match

  • 3 digits
  • followed by a /
  • followed by 3 digits
  • followed by /?any_text (e.g. /?hi) (optional)

This example uses regular expression anchors like ^ and $, but they are not required if you only try to match against the target string.

var result = '123/456/?hi'.match(/\d{3}\/\d{3}(\/\?.*)?/);
if (result) {
    document.write(result[0]);
}
else {
    document.write('no match');
}
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Maybe you could replace your {3} by + and your .* by [^ ]* –  sp00m Apr 24 '12 at 7:25
    
@sp00m The OP still doesn't say if there can by any number of digits. –  splash Apr 24 '12 at 7:27
    
I get error when I try '123/456/?hi'.match(/\d{3}/\d{3}(/\?.*)?/) –  Codler Apr 24 '12 at 7:28
    
@Codler What is the error? –  splash Apr 24 '12 at 7:36
    
It works now, thanks! I needed to escape / –  Codler Apr 24 '12 at 7:45

This regular expression will work /^\d{3}\/\d{3}(\/\?.*)?/

See this JSFiddle.

Note: if you think it should match any number of digits then use \d+ instead of \d{3}. The later matches exactly 3 digits.

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I missed to say one important thing. It must not end with '?', a string like '123/456/?hi' should also match. –  Codler Apr 24 '12 at 7:17
    
aha. Then update your question. I have update the answer too. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Apr 24 '12 at 7:21

Here you are:

[0-9]+/[0-9]+(/\?[^ ]*)?
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What other rules do you have?

If you want to accept all strings with last character other than ?, use "[^?]$"

If you want to accept strings that start with 123/456 and optionally end with /?, use "^123/456(/\?)?$"

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I missed to say one important thing. It must not end with '?', a string like '123/456/?hi' should match also. –  Codler Apr 24 '12 at 7:11
    
Then use the first expression. –  Joni Apr 24 '12 at 7:14

I think this should work:

'123/456'.match(/^123\/456(\/\?)?$/) // returns ["123/456", undefined]
'123/456/'.match(/^123\/456(\/\?)?$/) // returns null
'123/456/?'.match(/^123\/456(\/\?)?$/) // returns ["123/456/?", "/?"]

EDIT: added the other cases

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