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Inside text file

Letter A = "AAA"
Letter B = "BBB"

I try:

perl -p -e 's/(Letter A \=)(.*\")(\n+)(Letter B \=)/$1$2$3$4/g' text

But it doesn't work. The problem seems to be after \n.

Any idea?

Actually I want to exchange the words, how can we do that?
From:
Letter A = "AAA"
Letter B = "BBB"
To:
Letter A = "BBB"
Letter B = "AAA"

If there are others words between 2 lines. Any other solutions?

ABCABC
Letter A = "BBB"
Letter B = "AAA"
DSAAS
TRQWTR
Letter C = "DDD"
Letter D = "CCC"
SDAGER
LPITET

share|improve this question
    
Why you think problem is after \n? do you have an error message? (and yes, the + looks strange, but I don't know anything about perl.) –  Shegit Brahm Apr 24 '12 at 7:16
    
The result is: Letter A = "AAA" Letter B = "BBB" Same as original –  Radek Chan Apr 24 '12 at 7:21
    
Your revised version takes the trailing newline into $3 but does not include $3 in the substitution, which means it is removed from the output. –  geekosaur Apr 24 '12 at 7:25

3 Answers 3

If you put it into a small program you could do something like this. The commented out part at the top shows that it would work for more than one pair of lines. The way I built it you'd have to pipe the text file in, though.

# my $text = qq~Letter A = "AAA"
# Letter B = "BBB"
# Letter C = "CCC"
# Letter D = "DDD"~;
# 
# my @temp = split /\n/, $text;
my @temp = <>;

for (my $i=0; $i <= $#temp; $i+=2) {
  $temp[$i] =~ m/"(\w+)"/;
  my $w1 = $1;
  $temp[$i+1] =~ s/"(\w+)"/"$w1"/;
  my $w2 = $1;
  $temp[$i] =~ s/"$w1"/"$w2"/;
}
print join "\n", @temp;

Output:

Letter A = "BBB"
Letter B = "AAA"
Letter C = "DDD"
Letter D = "CCC"

This is what the code would have to look like if there can be other lines in between.

my $text = qq~Letter A = "AAA"
testtesttest
Letter B = "BBB"
loads 
of text
Letter C = "CCC"
Letter D = "DDD"
Letter E = "EEE"

Letter F = "FFF"~;

my @temp = split /\n/, $text;
# my @temp = <>;

my $last_index; # use this to remember where the last 'fist line' was
for (my $i=0; $i <= $#temp; $i+=1) {
  if (!defined $last_index) {
    # if we have not find a 'first line' yet, look if this is it
    $last_index = $i if $temp[$i] =~ m/"(\w+)"/;
  } elsif ($temp[$i] =~ m/"(\w+)"/) {
    # otherwhise if we already have a 'first line', check if this is a 'second line'
    $temp[$last_index] =~ m/"(\w+)"/; # use the 'first line'
    my $w1 = $1; 
    $temp[$i] =~ s/"(\w+)"/"$w1"/; # and the current line
    my $w2 = $1;
    $temp[$last_index] =~ s/"$w1"/"$w2"/;
    $last_index = undef; # remember to reset the 'first line'
  }
}
print join "\n", @temp;

Output:

Letter A = "BBB"
testtesttest
Letter B = "AAA"
loads 
of text
Letter C = "DDD"
Letter D = "CCC"
Letter E = "FFF"

Letter F = "EEE"
share|improve this answer
    
If there are others words between 2 lines, they won't works ABCABC Letter A = "BBB" Letter B = "AAA" DSAAS TRQWTR Letter C = "DDD" Letter D = "CCC" SDAGER LPITET –  Radek Chan Apr 25 '12 at 8:27
    
@RadekChan could you please add \n to your example. I don't understand what you mean. Or maybe I do. Since you didn't say about the file containing anything else, I left that out. You'd have to not use $i and $i+1 but have a variable outside the loop remember the index of the first of two occurences and use that instead of $i and $i instead of $i+1. That way you'd switch out a pair of these lines even if there's a bunch of other stuff in between. –  simbabque Apr 25 '12 at 10:20
    
See my edit of the answer for additional example code. –  simbabque Apr 25 '12 at 10:36

-p splits the input into lines, which means your pattern will never see a \n anywhere but at the end of the text it is looking at. If you want to do multiline matching, you will need to write an actual script or change the input record separator so that it is not split on lines (perhaps -0777 to use "slurp" mode).

perl -0777 -p -e 's/(Letter A =)(.*")(\n+)(Letter B =)/$1 Hello$2$3$4 Hello/' test2
Letter A = Hello "AAA"
Letter B = Hello "BBB"
share|improve this answer
    
If I do it that way, it works. perl -p -e 's/(Letter A \=)(.*\")(\n+)/$1$2/g' test2 Letter A = "AAA"Letter B = "BBB" –  Radek Chan Apr 24 '12 at 7:23
    
And? Perhaps you should also mention what you expect to happen; all your regexes simply copy the input to the output unchanged. –  geekosaur Apr 24 '12 at 7:25
    
I want to add some words between them. From Letter A = "AAA" Letter B = "BBB" To Letter A = "AAA" Hello Letter B = Hello "BBB" –  Radek Chan Apr 24 '12 at 7:27
    
Then perhaps you should add the words in the substitution part (where the $1$2... are). –  geekosaur Apr 24 '12 at 7:29
2  
We're back to the original issue I mentioned: unless you change the input separator, you will only ever see one line at a time. In particular, your pattern with the \n in the middle can never match because the \n is always at the end of the line; the Letter B part is on the next line, which the script has not yet read. –  geekosaur Apr 24 '12 at 7:39

I think you need this. Try it

perl -pe 's/$\\n/Hello/g' filename

Output

[tethomas@~/Perl]cat t
Letter A = "AAA"
Letter B = "BBB"
[tethomas@~/Perl]perl -pe 's/$\\n/Hello/g' t
Letter A = "AAA"HelloLetter B = "BBB"Hello
share|improve this answer
    
Actually I want to exchange the words, how can we do that? From: Letter A = "AAA" Letter B = "BBB" To: Letter A = "BBB" Letter B = "AAA" –  Radek Chan Apr 24 '12 at 8:17

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