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How can I describe a map of lambda? I want to have a map of lambda which will be called on event (just as a simple callback). The lambda type is constant.

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Do you mean a std::map of them, or something else? – Nicol Bolas Apr 24 '12 at 8:15
    
Yep, I mean that std::map should contain lambda functions. – Ilya Shcherbak Apr 24 '12 at 8:26
    
I doubt that lambda type is actually a "constant". In this case all lamdas would belong to the same lambda class and therefore do the same thing :). Perhaps, lambda signatures are the same? – user396672 Apr 24 '12 at 8:30
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@user396672: Actually, the C++ standard precies that each lambda has a unique type of its own. However, they can be safely wrapped into std::function< XXX > with the appropriate signature and even (for those without captures) degenerate into simple pointer to functions. – Matthieu M. Apr 24 '12 at 8:33
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mpl means meta programming library. boost.org/doc/libs/1_49_0/libs/mpl/doc/index.html It is basically based on templates. – balki Apr 25 '12 at 17:33
up vote 13 down vote accepted

Use the <functional> header and the std::function template class. This allows you to specify function objects with a fixed method signature.

std::map< unsigned int, std::function<int(int,int)> > callbackMap;

Assuming that you index the callbacks using an unsigned int, the above map stores functions that take in two int and return an int.

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aha, great thanks for your response. i'll try it just now. – Ilya Shcherbak Apr 25 '12 at 2:25
    
yep, that's what i need. thanks again. – Ilya Shcherbak Apr 25 '12 at 2:34

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