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The OS is Linux. I have a server process that can change its port realtime. However I would like to know in advance if a port is free before binding.

Scenario: Server binds localhost:5000 and receives a request to bind at localhost:6000. The server has to check if the port is free. This question seeks for answers that provide a routine that checks if a port is free or not.

For the record, I am editing my question with a code snippet that checks if a port is free to use. This does not mean that it will be used. The code below answer to the question "if the port is available right now", it does not use it. Opens a socket, check if bind returns EADDRINUSE and closes the socket.

#include <iostream>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <errno.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

    struct sockaddr_in serv_addr;
    if( argc < 2 )
        return 0;
    int port = atoi(argv[1]);

    int sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
    if( sockfd < 0 ) {
        printf("socket error\n");
        return 0;
    } else {
        printf("Opened fd %d\n", sockfd);
    }

     bzero((char *) &serv_addr, sizeof(serv_addr));
     serv_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
     serv_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
     serv_addr.sin_port = htons(port);
     if (bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &serv_addr, sizeof(serv_addr)) < 0) {

        if( errno == EADDRINUSE )
        {
            printf("the port is not available. already to other process\n");
        } else {
            printf("could not bind to process (%d) %s\n", errno, strerror(errno));
        }
    }

    if (close (sockfd) < 0 ) {
        printf("did not close fd: %s\n", strerror(errno));
        return errno;
    }

    return 0;


}

Here are some sample runs (partial outputs)

[bash{1051}{51}]:[~/some_sources/checkbind]::./a.out 41067
the port is not available. already to other process
[bash{1052}{52}]:[~/some_sources/checkbind]::./a.out 22
could not bind to process (13) Permission denied
[bash{1053}{53}]:[~/some_sources/checkbind]::./a.out 22000
Opened fd 3
share|improve this question
10  
Try binding to it, if it fails, it's not free... –  Nick Apr 24 '12 at 8:44
1  
Nicks suggestion is probably the most portable solution, but there might be OS-specific ways to do it as well. What operating-system will you be using? –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 24 '12 at 8:46
    
@Nick looks that bind returns EADDRINUSE (errno) if the port is it not free. –  cateof Apr 24 '12 at 9:06
6  
Even if you somehow manage to verify that the port is free, there's no guarantee it will be free at the time you actually try to bind it. –  n.m. Apr 24 '12 at 9:12
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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

This is an obvious race condition, since other processes on your system might be binding to ports in parallel. So, any solution you find will be imperfect, and you will still need to just write it according to the "try to bind(), if it fails pick a new port number and try again" approach.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree that a race condition might occur, but in my system this scenario is not possible. Also the "pick the next port" approach is not acceptable. –  cateof Apr 24 '12 at 9:14
    
@cateof: What is not possible? Is the race condition not possible, or is it not possible to try binding and then see if it fails? –  Dietrich Epp Apr 24 '12 at 9:19
    
The race condition is possible if you have at least two processes competing for a resource. In my system only one process tries to bind. –  cateof Apr 24 '12 at 9:24
3  
@cateof If only only process tries to bind, doesn't that mean that the other port must be free? –  RedX Apr 24 '12 at 9:32
2  
@cateof Maybe both processes start at the same time, think of sshd being restarted by the time your program starts. Always assume a race-condition applies if you cannot control ALL parameters involved. So just try to bind and see if it succeeds. That is by far the best and safest way. –  RedX Apr 24 '12 at 10:12
show 2 more comments

If your server was told what port to use, just bind() it. Seriously.

Sure, you could parse /proc/net/tcp and see if the port's in use. But then what? You still need to call bind() now that you know your port is free, and it'll tell you if the port was free then anyway, and so there was no point in groveling through /proc/net/tcp and doing all that (slow!) string production and parsing and extra kernel trips through not-very-well-optimized (read: super slow compared to bind()) diagnostic paths, just to get information that could well be out of date before you even finished parsing it. So just call bind() and be happy.

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I struggled with this myself and have slightly modified your code.

The solution is to set serv_addr.sin_port = 0 (auto assign port).

Note In the bind() and the getsockname() lines there are unclean casts from sockaddr_in to sockaddr. I have seen it done many places and I'm looking for a safer solution.

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>

// ... snip ...

int sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
if(sock < 0) {
    printf("socket error\n");
    return;
}
printf("Opened %d\n", sock);

struct sockaddr_in serv_addr;
bzero((char *) &serv_addr, sizeof(serv_addr));
serv_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
serv_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
serv_addr.sin_port = 0;
if (bind(sock, (struct sockaddr *) &serv_addr, sizeof(serv_addr)) < 0) {
    if(errno == EADDRINUSE) {
        printf("the port is not available. already to other process\n");
        return;
    } else {
        printf("could not bind to process (%d) %s\n", errno, strerror(errno));
        return;
    }
}

socklen_t len = sizeof(serv_addr);
if (getsockname(sock, (struct sockaddr *)&serv_addr, &len) == -1) {
    perror("getsockname");
    return;
}

printf("port number %d\n", ntohs(serv_addr.sin_port));


if (close (sock) < 0 ) {
    printf("did not close: %s\n", strerror(errno));
    return;
}

Program output

Opened 4
port number 59081
share|improve this answer
    
"In the getsockname(...) line there is a dangerous cast from sockaddr_in to sockaddr." In what way do you think it is dangerous? Maybe you want to use sockaddr_storage in order to be really safe. –  glglgl Dec 31 '13 at 1:52
    
They have the same size 16 bytes. The sin_len and sin_family are located the same place in both structs. I just don't like reinterpret_cast casts. –  neoneye Dec 31 '13 at 2:09
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