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Duplicate: Many to Many Relation Design - Intersection Table Design

If I have these tables (* = primary key):

user
  id*
  name

group
  id*
  name

Is this better?

user_group
  user_id*
  group_id*

Or is this better?

user_group
  id*
  user_id
  group_id
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Better is subjective. Both will work just fine. My personal vote would be for composite key, but again personal preference. –  Jeremy Coenen Jun 22 '09 at 21:29
    
This is a duplicate of several other questions on SO. It's a legitimate question, but it has been asked and answered before. –  Bill Karwin Jun 22 '09 at 23:39
4  
The link that was indicated as a duplicate has an accepted answer that doesn't really answer this question. –  Greg Dean Jun 23 '09 at 1:38
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6 Answers

I am always voting for keys that are as narrow as possible, static (never change) and thus I usually favor a surrogate INT as a key over a compound key.

If you want to reference a compound key from another table, you'll always have to specify several conditions - which can get quite unwieldy at times!

Also check out some of those links:

(of course, others will likely post at least 10 links PRO natural keys :-) )

There's no harm in using a surrogate key - go for it! :-)

Marc

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In this example, UserId and GroupId are not natural keys. They are foreign keys that each reference a surrogate. The question of natural keys doesn't even arise in this case. –  Walter Mitty Jun 23 '09 at 9:54
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Whenever I've omitted a surrogate primary key from a join table, I've come to regret it. It just seems like when I get around to writing the code to manage the relation that having a surrogate primary key is very handy. I typically follow an Active Record pattern and am using ASP.NET MVC, though, so your mileage may vary. In the MVC world, having a single id key you can put on the end of the URL is very advantageous.

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What for? And in what way adding a single id is so much better than to put two? –  Vinko Vrsalovic Jun 22 '09 at 21:41
    
The basic reason is that in MVC the url pattern is typically, /controller/action/id. If I don't use a surrogate key, then my url ends up as /controller/action/?user_id=...&group_id=..., which also means that I need include both ids in the view as hidden inputs, etc. A single id just fits into the pattern more neatly. –  tvanfosson Jun 22 '09 at 22:04
    
Why would there be a URL to a link "object"? There would only be URLs to group entities or member entities. A link should not be an object in your solution space. A link is a artifact of a database design which facilitates object collection membership in your solution space. –  Cade Roux Jun 23 '09 at 4:55
3  
When you want to delete an association, for example. Or, when the join table actually has (or gets) more information -- say it represents a registration for an event, which eventually gets an associated amount charged and a timestamp. In my experience, there have been enough times I didn't use a surrogate key, that I later had to add it that now I just always use it. –  tvanfosson Jun 23 '09 at 12:17
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Given than both user_id and group_id are already surrogate keys and thus guaranteed to be unique (given proper implementation of the app), adding a third id is totally redundant.

Unless you are using some kind of ORM which (sadly) usually make more complex the handling of composite keys. In that case you must evaluate the cost of redundancy versus the ease of development with your chosen ORM.

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The first example is sufficient. Even if you were to add attributes to the many-to-many table construct (like is_main_grp, etc.), there is no real need for a surrogate in the link table, and you'll probably always want a unique constraint on user_id, group_id anyway.

Only if you were to hang another many-to-one relationship on the link relationship (like tags), THEN I would think about having a surrogate in the user_group table, and I would not do it until it was a requirement (since a surrogate is relatively easy to add):

user
  id*
  name

group
  id*
  name

user_group
  id*
  user_id
  group_id
  is_main_grp

user_group_tags
  user_group_id*
  tag_id*

tags
  id*
  tag_txt
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I normally recommend "artificial keys" (what you're calling "surrogate") because, as they're essentially meaningless outside the DB, you can guarantee they will never have to change due to external circumstances (while all kinds of other data about an entity well might).

But your user_group table, a typical "two foreign keys and that's all" arrangement used to implement a many:many relationship, is a different case -- the two foreign keys in question are just as much under your control as the surrogate would be. The surrogate key for a non-entity, i.e. a row that only exists to represent a little bit of a relationship, is basically just deadweight -- I'd recommend losing it.

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I would ordinarily agree with Vinko, but if you're using an ORM, like Hibernate, it can be a happier relationship (between you and Hibernate) if you give everything a surrogate key.

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But a link is a database design artifact, and has nothing to do with the object model - it simply allows the database to link entities - this table should not even be visible to applications. –  Cade Roux Jun 22 '09 at 21:38
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