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There are many posts (questions) about comma operator overloading in c++. Most of the answers advice to DO NOT use comma operator overloading. I want to write a c++ library with a syntax very similar to Matlab language. The basic object is a Matrix MX. I want to be able to make the end-user of the library to write expressions like :

MX a = b(i);// get b elements at indices i 
b(i,j)= a; // set elements of b at indices i,j.

I have an idea about how to do make the setter & the getter work as written above using a Proxy Class that save a pointer to the MX object and save also the indices i,j objects. For example b(i,j) will create a Proxy object ProxMX(b,i,j). Then we define a method to assign ProxMX to MX and visversa (using operator =) that do the hard job of getting & setting the elements of b.

I need help to make function calls like :

(x,y,z)= ff(a,b,c) 

Where a, b, c are inputs argments (MX objects) and x, y , z are output argments . if the above syntaxe is not not possible i can think about a syntaxe like :

ff((a,b,c), (x,y,z) )

I started writing this test code:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;




class MX {// Matrix 

public:
    MX(double va) {
        elem=va;// only one double for the moment to test the syntaxe
    }
    MX &operator ()(MX idx){ // get & set MX(i)
        return *this;//
    };
    MX &operator ()(MX idx1,MX idx2) { // get set MX(i,j)
        return *this;
    } ;
    friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &stream, MX a);

    double elem;

};

ostream &operator<<(ostream &stream, MX a)
{
  stream << a.elem ;

  return stream;
}

typedef vector<const MX > MXR;
class ArgList { // Proxy
public:
    //ArgList(const MX& a){
    //  data.push_back(a);
    //}
    ArgList() {};

    ArgList& operator , (const MX &a){
        data.push_back(a);
        return *this;
   }
   ArgList& operator =(ArgList& ins){
        for (int i=0 ;i <ins.data.size();i++)
            (this->data[i]).elem=ins.data[i].elem;
        return *this;
   };
    MXR data; 
};


ArgList operator , (const MX& a, const MX& b){
    ArgList out;    
    out.data.push_back(a);
    out.data.push_back(b);
    return out;
   }

ArgList ff(ArgList argins)
{

    int n = argins.data.size();
    MX a= argins.data[0];
    MX b= argins.data[1];
    MX x(a.elem+1.0);
    MX y(b.elem+10.0);
    MX z(a.elem+b.elem);
    return ( x, y , z);

}
void gg(ArgList argins, ArgList &argout)
{

    int n = argins.data.size();
    MX a= argins.data[0];
    MX b= argins.data[1];
    MX x(a.elem+1.0);
    MX y(b.elem+10.0);
    MX z(a.elem+b.elem);
    argout = ( x, y , z);

}
int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    MX a(1.0);MX b(2.0);MX c(3.0);
    MX aa = a(MX(3.0));
    aa(MX(2.0),MX(3.0))=MX(5.0);
    cout << "a=" << a << ",b=" << b << ",c=" << c << endl;
    MX x(0.0);MX y(0.0);MX z(0.0);
    cout << "x=" << x << ",y=" << y << ",z=" << z << endl;
    (x,y,z)= ff((a , b, c ));
    cout << "x=" << x << ",y=" << y << ",z=" << z << endl;
    gg((a,b,c) , (x,y,z));
    cout << "x=" << x << ",y=" << y << ",z=" << z << endl;
    return 0;
}

This code compiles & runs without errors using VS2010 Express :). But as expected it does not give the expected results because I need to save references to variables in the ArgList instead of making a copy of objects to vector. I know that we cannot use std::vector as a container of references to objects.

Any help in order to make theses expressions writables and working in c++ code. Thanks.

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2  
Can you please elaborate more what your actual problem? That it doesn't behave as you expect it to? That you need some other container than std::vector? Something else? –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 24 '12 at 9:20
    
I need help to make expressions like (x,y,z)=ff((a,b,c)) work to call a function in c++. My first test code let me think that a container that accepte reference to ojects could be the right direction. But I'm not sur. –  Yazou Apr 24 '12 at 9:29
2  
There are a number of existing open-source linear algebra libraries for C++ that aim to provide MATLAB-like syntax, such as Armadillo and Blitz++. You could have a look at their source. –  James Apr 24 '12 at 9:39
    
I already looked to Blitz++ and I think that making indexing operators "a la Matlab" in c++ is possible. But I don't think that function call à la Matlab in c++ was already done. –  Yazou Apr 24 '12 at 9:46
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm using C++11 to outline you a solution (the code is tested, too), but this is doable in C++03 (using e.g. Boost.Tuple):

// Base case
template<typename Lhs, typename Rhs>
std::tuple<Lhs&, Rhs&>
operator,(Lhs& lhs, Rhs& rhs)
{
    return std::tie(lhs, rhs);
}

// General case when we already have a tuple
template<typename... Lhs, typename Rhs>
std::tuple<Lhs..., Rhs&>
operator,(std::tuple<Lhs...>&& lhs, Rhs& rhs)
{
    return std::tuple_cat(lhs, std::tie(rhs));
}

Usage looks like (assuming this operator resides in namespace ns):

// Declaration: note how ff must return a tuple
std::tuple<X, Y, Z> ff(A, B, C);

A a = /* ... */;
B b = /* ... */;
C c = /* ... */;
X x; Y y; Z z;

using ns::operator,;
// brackets on the left-hand side are required
(x, y, z) = ff(a, b, c);

Here are the attached caveats:

  • as you've seen, you need a using declaration to bring operator, in scope. Even if the types X, Y, Z reside in the same scope of operator, (to enable ADL), std::tuple doesn't. You could do something like template<typename... T> struct tuple: std::tuple<T...> { using std::tuple<T...>::tuple; }; (not as convenient to do in C++03 however) to have your own tuple in the appropriate namespace to have ADL in a quick-and-dirty way. However:

  • overloaded operators must always operate on at least one user-defined type. So if types X and Y both happen to be types like int or double, then you get the default operator,. The usual solution to things like this is to require the client to do instead something like (ref(x), ref(y), z) = ff(a, b, c); where ref will return a type in the appropriate namespace (for ADL purposes, again). Perhaps such type can be implemented in terms of std::reference_wrapper (or the Boost version, for C++03) with the same quick-and-dirty hack as for the tuple. (You'd need additional overloads of operator,.)

All in all, that's a lot of work (with ugly workarounds) when something like

/* declaration of ff and variable definitions the same as before */
std::tie(x, y, z) = ff(a, b, c);

or perhaps

/* this skips unnecessary default constructions of x, y, z */
auto tuple = ff(a, b, c);
using std::get;
auto& x = get<0>(tuple);
auto& y = get<1>(tuple);
auto& z = get<2>(tuple);

works out of the box (even in C++03 with Boost.Tuple). My advice in this matter would be (with no slight intended): Keep it simple, stupid! and to use that.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. I cann't try this code now because I'm using visual studio 2010. The C++11 is not a real option for the moment because it could in the near future.BTW, what is the ns::operator , ? –  Yazou Apr 24 '12 at 10:46
    
For non c++ programmers (like the end-users of my lib) If I cann't write (x,y)=ff(a,b) in c++ I think that writing ff(a,b,IO_DUMMY_SEP,x,y) is more elegant than auto tuple & get<i> solution. Do you agree ? –  Yazou Apr 24 '12 at 11:12
    
@Yazou Again, all of this is possible with C++03 (std::tuple is largely based on the work of Boost.Tuple), although some things may be somewhat painful to implement (e.g. due to lack of variadic templates). ns::operator, designates the operator, in a fictitious namespace named ns; because you wouldn't overload an operator in the global namespace, much less a catch-all operator,. Finally remember that the first option I recommend is to have users write X x; Y y; tie(x, y) = ff(a, b);; the second variant is a special use (for when default construction is impossible or too costly). –  Luc Danton Apr 24 '12 at 11:55
    
Thanks again. I didn't draw attention that u have already explained the ns "namespace" in your comments. I'll look deeply to std::tuple in C++03 to see if I can make a working example of (x,y) =ff(a,b). –  Yazou Apr 24 '12 at 12:11
    
@Yazou In C++03 you'd likely use Boost.Tuple, meaning boost::tuple. There is no std::tuple in C++03, although maybe your compiler supports TR1 which does have a tuple. In any case I don't recommend reinventing a tuple without variadic templates (a C++11-only feature). –  Luc Danton Apr 24 '12 at 13:23
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In C++11, you can do this using tuples:

std::tuple<some_type, another_type, yet_another_type> ff(...);

some_type x;
another_type y;
yet_another_type z;

std::tie(x,y,z) = ff(a,b,c);

If your compiler doesn't support that, the Boost.Tuple library is very similar, but may be more restricted without support from variadic templates.

If you really want to support syntax like (x,y,z) = ff(a,b,c);, which might be rather confusing to a C++ programmer even if it does look sensible in Matlab, then you're almost there. You need a separate type similar to your ArgList (perhaps called something like RefList), which contains pointers rather than values, initialises these pointers from non-const references to the results, and has an assignment operator that takes an ArgList (or some other collection of values) and assigns each element via the pointers.

You might also want to look at Boost.Assignment to see how that kind of operator overloading can be made to work. It's a bit of a hassle; in particular, you can't overload operators that act only on built-in types, which rather limits the usefulness of that approach. Personally, I'd use variadic templates instead if C++11 is an option.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. I already considered Boost.Assignement but i didn't know about std::tuple in C++11. What i want is to avoid using std::anything(x,y,z,w,t) for the end-user of my lib. I can write Proxy classes internal to my lib in order keep the syntaxe for the end-user very simple and very clean. My end-user are not c++ programmers but Matlab programmers. If std::tuple works I must provide comma operator that would construct tuples behand the scene in order make the final expression : (x,y,z,t,w)=ff(a,b,c,d,f,g). –  Yazou Apr 24 '12 at 10:08
    
@Yazou: I've added some pointers as to how you might acheive that. Be aware that it will make the code look rather odd to someone accustomed to C++. –  Mike Seymour Apr 24 '12 at 10:20
    
@Mile: Thanks again. If C++11 is not an option. What are candidats containers that I can use in my first attemp code (ArgList Proxy) in order to save references to the MX objs ? –  Yazou Apr 24 '12 at 11:16
    
@Yazou: std::vector<MX*> would be the simplest. –  Mike Seymour Apr 24 '12 at 11:22
    
Great :) I was tring this solution but I got some errors about assiging non const MX *. –  Yazou Apr 24 '12 at 11:36
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Thank you all for your sugesstions & feedback. here is a working example using 2 proxies. ArgList contains pointers to MX objects and ArgCopyList contains copies of MX objects.

From a matlab user point of view the c++ syntaxe (x,y,...)=myfunc((a,b,...)) is very similar to the matlab expression [x,y,...]=myfunc(a,b,...). But my first impression is that this kind of function calling is not efficient at all because the returned values are copied which could be avoided by passing outputs by reference.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class MX {// Matrix 

public:
    MX(double va) {
        elem=va;// only one double for the moment to test the syntaxe
    }
    MX & operator = (const MX &src)
    {   elem = src.elem;
        return *this;
    }
    friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &stream, MX &a);

    double elem;

};

ostream &operator<<(ostream &stream, MX &a)
{
  stream << a.elem ;

  return stream;
}

typedef vector<MX *> MXR; // save pointers only 

class ArgCopyList { // copy the objects to a list
public :
    vector<const MX> data; 
    ArgCopyList(MX &a)
    {
        data.push_back(a);
    };
    ArgCopyList(MX &a, MX &b)
    {
        data.push_back(a);
        data.push_back(b);
    };
    ArgCopyList(MX &a, MX &b, MX &c)
    {
        data.push_back(a);
        data.push_back(b);
        data.push_back(c);
    };
    // do the same for bigger lists

};

class ArgList { // Proxy
public:

    ArgList() {};

    ArgList(const ArgList& src) 
    {
        data.clear();
        for (int i=0 ;i <src.data.size();i++)
            data.push_back(src.data[i]);
    }
    ArgList& operator , ( MX &a){
        data.push_back(&a);
        return *this;
   }

    ArgList  &operator= ( ArgList &src)
    {
        if (this == &src)
            return *this;
        data.clear();
        int n= src.data.size();
        for (int i=0 ;i <n;i++)
            data.push_back(src.data[i]);
        return *this;
    };


   ArgList& operator =( ArgCopyList& src){
        for (int i=0 ;i <data.size();i++)// TBD : must control the size of src & this->data here
            data.at(i)->elem = (src.data[i].elem);
        return *this;
   };
    MXR data; 
};


ArgList operator , (MX& a,  MX& b){
    ArgList out;    
    out.data.push_back(&a);
    out.data.push_back(&b);
    return out;
   }

// test function
ArgCopyList ff(ArgList argins)
{

    int n = argins.data.size();
    MX a= *(argins.data[0]);
    MX b= *(argins.data[1]);
    MX x(a.elem+1.0);
    MX y(b.elem+10.0);
    MX z(a.elem+b.elem);
    return ArgCopyList( x, y , z);

}


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{

    MX a(1.0);MX b(2.0);MX c(3.0);
    cout << "a=" << a << ",b=" << b << ",c=" << c << endl;

    MX x(0.0);MX y(0.0);MX z(0.0);
    cout << "Argouts before calling (x,y,z)= ff((a,b,c)).\nx=" << x << ",y=" << y << ",z=" << z << endl;

    (x,y,z)= ff((a , b, c) );

    cout << "Argouts after calling ff.\nx=" << x << ",y=" << y << ",z=" << z << endl;
    return 0;
}

/* output
a=1,b=2,c=3
Argouts before calling (x,y,z)= ff((a,b,c)).
x=0,y=0,z=0
Argouts after calling ff.
x=2,y=12,z=3
*/
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