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In every blog, on every site, on every forum, all you hear about Node is how people use it for web development, similar to Ruby on Rails. And at the same time you always hear the slogan "for easily building fast, scalable network applications". My simple question is, can it be used for other server applications as well? Or rather, should it? There is the TCP server example of course, but is Node good/fast enough for other things than a web server? Like... a server for an online game? This is just a question out of curiosity, since it looks like it shouldn't be too much of a problem.

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Node.JS at it's core is a high-performance i/o library/framework. So you can basically build ANY application that relies on fast i/o operations (which of course includes a web-server).

Since it's not a scripting language like PHP, you do not rely on a seperate server application to host your code; it's self-hosted.

So to answer your question: yes, you can build ANY server application using node.js (be it a server for an online game, an e-mail server or even a high-speed feed parser for machine-generated data).

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Node.js is a scripting language. It does not go through a compilation or linker step. Saying it is different from PHP because it doesn't rely on a separate server application is also false. You can run PHP scripts from the console just like you can node.js scripts. You can also create an http server entirely in PHP that serves PHP scripts, just like node.js. nanoweb.si.kz The primary difference between the two is that Node.js is build around ecmascript and revolves around non-blocking IO. Not to mention node.js has a much more sane and consistent set of core libraries. –  Timothy Strimple Apr 25 '12 at 2:33
    
Sorry, went past my edit window. Strictly speaking, Node.js isn't a scripting language, it's an environment for running Javascript scripts. Depends on how picky you want to be with semantics. –  Timothy Strimple Apr 25 '12 at 2:43

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