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I`ve got the following Ruby classes:

class Sandwich
  class << self
    def prepare_with(special_ingredient, &block)
      # Some very very special magic is done here to
      # call instead just .fry! as .fry!({:ingredient=>special_ingredient})
      # and for any other method the same
    end

    def fry!(opts= {})
    end

    def add_mayo(opts = {})
    end
  end
end

class Hamburger < Sandwich
end

=> Hamburger.prepare_with(bacon) do
=>   Hamburger.fry!
=>   Hamburger.add_mayo
=> end

I want to modify of calling all methods of Hamburger class and add additional key=>value into last parameter Hash.

Some special magic should be done in Sandwich.prepare_with to call all methods of Sandwich (and all its descendants), like call instead just .fry! as .fry!({:ingredient=>special_ingredient}).

EDITED: Additional point that ideally we need to filter calling of inside block code, for example following code would raise exception for any prepare_with code, that doesn`t filter methods it calling with additional parameter:

=> Hamburger.prepare_with(bacon) do
=>   Hamburger.fry!
=>   h = Hash.new("Go fish") 
=>   Hamburger.add_mayo
=> end
share|improve this question
    
edited my answer, let me know if this is what you were looking for –  p11y Apr 24 '12 at 12:54
    
do you mean Hash.new should throw an error? –  p11y Apr 24 '12 at 14:02
    
i don't know if i really understand your edit, but i think that it is a second question and that this problem is not trivial to solve. If you are trying to build a DSL here, you should probably stick with an external DSL instead. You can achieve this by building your own parser or by using treetop or racc, for example. Then you can raise an exception if an unknown statement occurs. –  p11y Apr 24 '12 at 14:31
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why wouldn't fry! and add_mayo be instance methods?

EDIT: as the question poster requested, without instance methods:

class Sandwich
  class << self
    def prepare_with(special_ingredient, &block)
      @@default_opts = {:special_ingredient => special_ingredient}
      block.call
    end

    def fry!(opts={})
      opts = opts.merge(@@default_opts)
      puts "fried with #{opts[:special_ingredient]}"
    end

    def add_mayo(opts = {})
      puts "added mayo"
    end
  end
end

class Hamburger < Sandwich
end

Hamburger.prepare_with(:bacon) do 
  Hamburger.fry!
  Hamburger.add_mayo
end

Hamburger.prepare_with(:tofu) do 
  Hamburger.fry!
end

output:

fried with bacon
added mayo
fried with tofu
share|improve this answer
    
They can`t be instance methods by problem definition) –  Sergey Apr 24 '12 at 12:44
    
Well, you have to remember the special ingredient somewhere. Remembering them in a class var seems odd, but wait a sec, i'll update my answer to reflect this. –  p11y Apr 24 '12 at 12:49
    
Please, look at me Edited notes. Thank you. –  Sergey Apr 24 '12 at 13:01
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Short answer

block.call :ingredient => special_ingredient

Long answer

I think you should be dealing with objects. add_mayo and fry should be instance methods instead of class methods.

I would see something like

class Sandwich
  class << self
    def prepare &block
      sandwich = self.new
      block.call sandwich
      sandwich
    end
  end

  def fry(opts = {})
    #stuff
  end

  def add_mayo(opts = {})
  end
end

class Hamburger < Sandwich; end

hamburger = Hamburger.prepare do |h|
  h.fry :ingredient => :bacon
  h.add_mayo
end
share|improve this answer
    
you beat me by time :) –  p11y Apr 24 '12 at 12:42
    
@padde I have to start waiting longer, my answers are always at the bottom. –  gmalette Apr 24 '12 at 18:57
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