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I'm searching for an efficient way to check if two numbers have the same sign.

Basically I'm searching for a more elegant way than this:

var n1 = 1;
var n2 = -1;

( (n1 > 0 && n2 > 0) || (n1<0 && n2 < 0) )? console.log("equal sign"):console.log("different sign");

A solution with bitwise operators would be fine too.

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1  
It's not JavaScript, but I guess all of these work as well: Simplest way to check if two integers have same sign?. –  Felix Kling Apr 24 '12 at 12:52
    
@FelixKling Yeah, i read this question but stopped at the accepted answer, which i wasn't satisfied with;) –  Christoph Apr 24 '12 at 12:55
2  
Well, the next answer is pretty cool imo: return ((x<0) ==(y<0));. –  Felix Kling Apr 24 '12 at 12:57
    
@FelixKling thats true, another case for "Don't stop reading after accepted answer" –  Christoph Apr 24 '12 at 12:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 24 down vote accepted

You can multiply them together; if they have the same sign, the result will be positive.

bool sameSign = (n1 * n2) > 0
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haha, this is a nice one;) –  Christoph Apr 24 '12 at 12:49
    
Yeah! Great answer! –  sp00m Apr 24 '12 at 12:49
    
That's very sexy code. –  lukecampbell Apr 24 '12 at 12:50
    
@Jason Hall this is so smart +1 –  ant Apr 24 '12 at 12:50
15  
What if n1 and n2 are both positive integers but multiplying them causes an integer overlow? –  Thorsten Dittmar Apr 24 '12 at 12:51

Fewer characters of code, but might overflow:

n1*n2 > 0 ? console.log("equal sign") : console.log("different sign or zero");

or without integer overflow, but slightly larger:

(n1>0) == (n2>0) ? console.log("equal sign") : console.log("different sign");

if you consider 0 as positive the > should be replaced with <

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1  
What if n1 and n2 are both positive integers but multiplying them causes an integer overlow? –  Thorsten Dittmar Apr 24 '12 at 12:52
    
Than the first version fails. So i added a more robust but slightly larger version. –  user1346466 Apr 24 '12 at 12:57

Use bitwise xor

n1^n2 >= 0 ? console.log("equal sign") : console.log("different sign");
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like that bitwise operator. –  Christoph Apr 24 '12 at 14:05
1  
testing for < 0 will make it one char smaller ;) –  user1346466 Apr 24 '12 at 14:45
n = n1*n2;
if(n>0){ same sign }
else { different sign }
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1  
What if n1 and n2 are both positive integers but multiplying them causes an integer overlow? –  Thorsten Dittmar Apr 24 '12 at 12:53
    
agreed. that might be a problem. –  sans481 Apr 24 '12 at 12:56

Maybe a regex should do the trick

function isNegative(num) { 
        if (num.match(/^-\d+$/)) {
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
   }


function isSameSign(num1, num2) { 
        var sameSign = false;  
        if (num1.match(/^-\d+$/) && num2.match(/^-\d+$/) ) {
                sameSign = true;
            } else if(!num2.match(/^-\d+$/) && !num2.match(/^-\d+$/)) {
                sameSign =true;
            }
        return sameSign;
       }
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This only returns whether one number is false. If you want to do that, you can just check num > 0 -- to convert a string to a number first you can do parseInt(num) > 0 –  Jason Hall Apr 24 '12 at 13:31
    
Well it just requires a tweak. I have updated and given a second version to show, how the first function can be modified to achieve the requirement –  Sandeep Nair Apr 24 '12 at 13:38
    
But you're still using a fragile regex instead of the built-in parseInt method. –  Jason Hall Apr 24 '12 at 14:38

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