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Recently I was asked a question:

We've got the setPriority() method to set a thread for low priority. Then why do we need a daemon thread. What's the difference between them?

Does marking a thread as daemon change its scheduling?

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3  
What language are we talking about here? – Gray Apr 24 '12 at 12:57
2  
..and what OS?? – Martin James Apr 24 '12 at 12:59
    
Remember to accept my answer if it is helpful. – Gray Nov 14 '14 at 23:24

We've got the setPriority() method to set a thread for low priority. Then why do we need a daemon thread. What's the difference between them?

Typically, daemon threads have nothing to do with priority. In Java, for example, the JVM shuts down when all user non-daemon threads finish. Marking a thread as a daemon thread means that it can be safely killed when the JVM exits.

Priority is about scheduling -- about how often a thread gets a time slice in comparison to other threads that are ready to run. You can have low priority daemon threads or high priority daemon threads. You can have non-daemon threads that are also low and high priority.

The concepts are orthogonal (mutually independent) -- at least in the Java thread model.

In terms of when to make a thread daemon, I use daemon threads for any tasks that I don't care if they are interrupted when the JVM quits: keep-alive threads, statistics processors, log handling, etc.. Everything mission critical to the application is a non-daemon thread that has to be specifically interrupted or signaled to quit somehow.

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Thanks Gray. So what is the use of creating a thread (in java) and making it a daemon thread? Is there any practical scenario where we use it? – Ash Apr 24 '12 at 16:52
    
I use daemon threads for anything that I don't care if it is interrupted when the JVM quits: keep-alive threads, statistics processors, log handling, etc.. Everything mission critical to the application is a non-daemon. – Gray Apr 24 '12 at 16:53

A running daemon thread will not prevent your program from ending/exiting. However, all user threads must end before your program can exit. Priority may apply to either daemon or user thread. You may understand priority the same way you understand it in everyday life.

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If the Java runtime determines that the only threads running in an application are daemon threads (i.e., there are no user threads in existence) the Java runtime promptly closes down the application, effectively stopping all daemon threads dead in their tracks. In order for an application to continue running, it must always have at least one live user thread. In all other respects the Java runtime treats daemon threads and user threads in exactly the same manner.

except that in daemon thread .. when JVM terminate abruptly then finally blocks are not executed, stacks are not unwound – JVM just exits. Due to this reason daemon threads should be used sparingly and it is dangerous to use them for tasks that might perform any sort of I/O.

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