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I have Code for The List of 10 workers And two methods below:

public void demoDeques() {
        int maxSizeOfJobDeque = 3;
        Producer producer = new ProducerImpl( maxSizeOfJobDeque );

        Logger.debug( "WorkFlowEngineImpl : " +
                "Creating Workers and adding them to allocator" );
        List<Worker> workerList = buildWorkerList( producer );
        Logger.debug( "WorkFlowEngineImpl : " +
                "Assigning some jobs to the workers. " +
                    "The workers have not been started yet");

        for ( int i=1; i<4; i++ ) {
            producer.assign( new JobImpl( "job " + i, i ) );
            try {
                Thread.sleep( 4000 );
            } catch( InterruptedException e ) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }

        Logger.debug( "WorkFlowEngineImpl : " + "Starting the workers" );
        startWorkersAndWait5Seconds( workerList );
        Logger.debug( "WorkFlowEngineImpl : " +
                "Assigning some more jobs to the " +
                    "started workers" );

        for ( int i=4; i<7; i++ ) {
            producer.assign( new JobImpl( "Job " + i, i ) );
            try {
                Thread.sleep( 4000 );
            } catch( InterruptedException e ) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }

        Logger.debug( "WorkFlowEngineImpl : " + "Assigning More Jobs" );
        for ( int i=7; i<11; i++ ) {
            producer.assign( new JobImpl( "job" + i, i ) );
            try {
                Thread.sleep( 4000 );
            } catch( InterruptedException e ) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

Producers:

public synchronized void assign( Job job ) {
    Set<Worker> workerSet = jobMap.keySet();
    LinkedBlockingDeque<Job> jobQueue;
    StringBuffer sb;

    for ( Worker worker : workerSet ) {
        jobQueue = jobMap.get( worker );

        sb = new StringBuffer();
        sb.append( "Assigning job " );
        sb.append( job.getJobNumber() );
        sb.append( " to " );
        sb.append( worker );
        sb.append( "'s jobs Deque" );

        Logger.debug( "Producer : " + sb.toString() );

        if ( ! jobQueue.offerFirst( job ) ) { 
            jobQueue.pollLast();
            jobQueue.offerFirst( job );
        }
    }
}

I am trying to change the two methods so that I have the allocator having a list of 100 jobs then allocating in such a way that each of the ten workers is given a max of three jobs at time until the 100 is reached i.e worker one takes jobs 1,2,3 worker two takes 4,5,6 so that when worker ten is reached it comes back to worker one assigning three jobs until hundredth job is reached then it stops and alerts that all the jobs have been assigned. Kindly help I am stuck....

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2  
Get that code in some kind of order. It doesn't even parse. –  Marko Topolnik Apr 24 '12 at 13:27
    
Can you explain a bit more about why you want that specific operation order? Why can you just use an ExecutorService to process the jobs? –  Gray Apr 24 '12 at 13:32
    
@Gray Yes It is a homework problem. I thought I would create some kind of a loop through the workers and also through the jobs.There's no preferred order if you can lead me to the direction of 'ExecutorService' well and good. –  CCharles Apr 24 '12 at 13:47

2 Answers 2

Although your question mentions specific execution order, your comments seem to indicate that this is not a true requirement. Instead of implementing your own thread pools, I recommend that you use the Executors provided in Java 1.5. For example:

ExecutorService threadPool =
    Executors.newFixedThreadPool(NUMBER_THREADS_TO_RUN_JOBS);
// your producers then just have to submit jobs to the pool
for ( int i=1; i<4; i++ ) {
    threadPool.submit(new JobImpl("Job " + i, i));
}

I can't see from your example exactly what processing needs to happen on each "job" but if JobImpl would need to implement Runnable for the above code to work. If you need to return some value from your job then you can change JobImpl to be Callable and use the Future returned by the submit(Callable) method to get the result returned by call().

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My JobImpl looks Like: public class JobImpl implements Job { private String job; private int jobNumber; public JobImpl( String job, int jobNumber ) { this.job = job; this.jobNumber = jobNumber; } public String getJob() { return this.job; } public int getJobNumber() { return this.jobNumber; } } –  CCharles Apr 29 '12 at 9:37
    
OK My main class has: ExecutorService threadPool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1); for ( int i=1; i<4; i++ ) { threadPool.submit(new JobImpl("Job ", i)); –  CCharles Apr 30 '12 at 19:07
    
But I need my JobImpl to return jdeque: public JobImpl( String job, int jobNumber ) { this.job = job; this.jobNumber = jobNumber; } ExecutorService executorService = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor(); executorService.execute(new JobImpl(job,jobNumber){ public void run(){ String j =Integer.toString(jobNumber); Deque<String> jdeque = new LinkedList<String>(); jdeque.add(job+j); } }); Future future = executorService.submit(new JobImpl(jdeque){ public JobImpl call() throws Exception { return jdeque; } }); –  CCharles Apr 30 '12 at 19:16
    
Whenever you call submit it returns a Future. If you submit a Callable<String> then your future.get() will return the value returned by the call() method. See here: sunels.wordpress.com/category/executorservice-example –  Gray May 1 '12 at 13:02

I disagree with your job assignment methodology, and I think that is what is hanging up your code.

In general, the producer should create the work and assign it to the queue. It's not the producer's responsibility to worry about doling out jobs. As the workers are available, they'll pull jobs from the queue. Whether they pull 1 job or 3 is simply a matter of logic within the worker thread as it pulls.

You'll probably want to create a singleton class for the queue. It should handle receiving and requesting jobs.

Approaching it this way allows you to decouple the workers from the producer. You can add more producers or workers as workload / bottlenecks dictate. It also keeps you from generating some sort of signaling mechanism where the worker indicates to the producer they are ready for more work. Finally, this keeps you from having to worry about various race conditions where only 1 job is available or the job numbering gets out of sequence with the magic numbers you have in place within demoDequeue.

HTH, sorry it's not a direct answer but should get you on a better path to solving the problem.

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1  
+1 for suggesting the avoidance of thread micro-management, something that nearly always ends badly, even when attempted by highly-skilled developers, (they only try it once:). –  Martin James Apr 24 '12 at 14:26
    
@MartinJames - thanks. Incorrect management of threads can definitely be a painful path to follow! –  GlenH7 Apr 24 '12 at 14:41

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