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I'm using a bit of legacy type code that runs on a framework, so I can't really explain whats going on at a lower level as I don't know.

However my code creates an array of objectives.

int maxSize = 20;
    myObjects = new Object*[maxSize+1];

    myObjects[0] = new item1(this);
    myObjects[1] = new item2(this);

    for(int i=2; i != maxSize+1; i++){
          myObjects[i] = new item3(this);
        }

    myObjects[maxSize+1] = NULL;

If maxSize is larger than 30 I get a whole load of errors I've never seen. Visual Studio draws up an error in xutility highlighting:

const _Container_base12 *_Getcont() const
    {   // get owning container
    return (_Myproxy == 0 ? 0 : _Myproxy->_Mycont);
    }

I've never used Malloc before, but is this where the problem lies. Should I be assigning using it to avoid this problem?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The absolute value of maxSize is probably not a culprit: allocating 30 pointers should go without trouble on any computer, including most micro-controllers. Using malloc is not going to change anything: you are doing your allocation the way you're supposed to do it in C++.

Here is the likely source of your error:

myObjects[maxSize+1] = NULL;

You have allocated storage for maxSize+1 items, so the valid indexes are between 0 and maxSize. Writing one past the last element is undefined behavior, meaning that a crash could happen. You got lucky with 20 elements, but 30 smoked out this bug for you. Using valgrind utility is a good way to catch memory errors that could cause crashes, even if they currently don't cause them.

int maxSize = 20;
myObjects = new Object*[maxSize+1];

myObjects[0] = new item1(this);
myObjects[1] = new item2(this);

// if maxsize is 1, this loop could be trouble
for(int i=2; i != maxSize; i++){
    myObjects[i] = new item3(this);
}

myObjects[maxSize] = NULL;
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But the new Object*[maxSize+1] uses the same call, so the size is 20+1 21? –  Eric Banderhide Apr 24 '12 at 13:31
1  
@EricBanderhide: Yes, but the 21 elements are indexed from 0 to 20. 21 is out of range. –  Mike Seymour Apr 24 '12 at 13:32
    
Sorry to be a bit dim, what should I do instead then? –  Eric Banderhide Apr 24 '12 at 13:34
    
@EricBanderhide Assuming that you need precisely maxSize items, you need to end the loop at i != maxSize, and write NULL to myObjects[maxSize] = NULL. –  dasblinkenlight Apr 24 '12 at 13:35
    
Thanks dasblink, I still get the exact same error on larger sizes. –  Eric Banderhide Apr 24 '12 at 13:55

You're going past the bounds with:

myObjects[maxSize+1] = NULL;

In your example, you created an array with 21 items. That will run from 0..20 but you're trying to write to the 21st element here.

The problem is not with new / delete as far as I can see, and I can't see any reason for switching to malloc here.

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You should not use malloc() in C++; you should use new.

There's one possible exception to this: if you have to allocate a block of memory which you intend to pass as an argument to a function which is going to eventually free it using free(). If you used new to allocate such a block the free() would likely cause heap corruption. But this is purely hypothetical -- I've never seen such an API!

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I think you can't access offset "maxSize+1". The solution is like:

myObjects = new Object*[maxSize+2];
...
myObjects[maxSize+1] = NULL;
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While technically correct the proposed solution fills me with dread. Why go the +2 route instead of changing the code to work to maxSize as is proper. A proper motivation may yet save you. –  r_ahlskog Apr 24 '12 at 13:59

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