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I'm trying to use a variable created in local scope without assigning that variable in global. Look what I mean :

<?
function foo(){
    $bar = inside;
}
foo();
echo $bar; // It will give an error that $bar is not assigned
?>

Now you may have understood what I'm trying..? Yes I want to echo that $bar without assigning it in global scope.

Some coding examples are well-honored.

Thanks in Advance

share|improve this question
1  
You are asking for globals without globals, which is obviously impossible. There is a better way to do what you want to do; tell us what it is. –  Jon Apr 24 '12 at 13:35
    
I am trying to make a function that makes SQL queries easier which returns the result of query in $result(local). I want to assign that $result to another variable(global) after running function –  yusufiqbalpk Apr 24 '12 at 13:55
1  
Do not do this. Your code will be horrible. Do what Quentin suggests, even though it's not what you asked. –  Jon Apr 24 '12 at 13:57
    
Pretty much this is exactly how $http_response_header works - too bad whoever came up with that didn't get the advice "Don't do this" :) –  Stuart Langley Jan 4 '13 at 0:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Only possibly way is to use the $GLOBALS super-global (at least without returning it):

function foo(){
  $GLOBALS['bar'] = 'baz';
}

foo();
echo $bar;

Otherwise you're looking at defining it in global scope first, then specifying you need access to it using global:

$bar = null;

function foo(){
  global $bar;

  $bar = 'baz';
}

foo();
echo $bar;

The better alternative is to use objects where scope remains within the object and you can still retain structure and integrity of code:

class Foo
{
  var $bar = null;

  function Bar()
  {
    $this->bar = 'baz';
  }
}

$foo = new Foo();
$foo->Bar();
echo $foo->bar;
share|improve this answer
1  
Eh... is this "without assigning that variable in global"? –  Jon Apr 24 '12 at 13:36
2  
This is specifically what the OP doens't want to do. –  Deleteman Apr 24 '12 at 13:37
    
@Jon/Deleteman: Yes, it defined it in global scope, however so does defining a variable just to assign it a returned value from a function (where do you think $bar is defined in Quentin's example?). You have to, at some point, define it there. It's a matter of "pre-defining" that's being alleviated. –  Brad Christie Apr 24 '12 at 13:38
    
First one example is perfect and that is what i want. Thanks Brad –  yusufiqbalpk Apr 24 '12 at 13:47

Use return values.

<?php
function foo(){
    $bar = "inside";
    return $bar;
}
$bar = foo();
echo $bar;
?>
share|improve this answer
    
I told that I want to use $bar without assigning. You assigned a function to $bar and that's not what I require. –  yusufiqbalpk Apr 24 '12 at 13:35
2  
@yusufiqbalpk — That might have been what you intended to say, but it was vague and open to interpretation. I assumed you meant "without using the global keyword". You cannot use data if it doesn't exist in the scope you want to use it in. That would be illogical and logic is the heart of programming. –  Quentin Apr 24 '12 at 13:36
    
Please tell me about Brad Christie answer. Is there's anything illogical ? –  yusufiqbalpk Apr 24 '12 at 13:39
2  
@yusufiqbalpk — It assigns it to a global supervariable (which is in scope for everything), so it isn't illogical. It is just a practise that leads to code that is horrible to maintain. –  Quentin Apr 24 '12 at 13:40

If you want to access the content of a local variable from outsite it's content, you have 3 options:

Using a global variable: Not usually recomended and not what you're looking for.

Return the value of that variable:

<?
function foo(){
    $bar = inside;
}
$outisde_bar = foo();
echo $outside_bar;
?>

Using a referenced variable as an attribute for the function:

<?
function foo(&$bar){
    $bar = inside;
}
foo($bar);
echo $bar;
?>

Does that help?

share|improve this answer
    
And I'm positive neither $outside_bar nor $bar are defined in global scope in this example, where as my example they clearly are... –  Brad Christie Apr 24 '12 at 13:40
    
Third example not working. Please check it –  yusufiqbalpk Apr 24 '12 at 13:48
    
On the third example, the &amp; should only be & but SO is changing it. –  Deleteman Apr 24 '12 at 13:54
    
@yusufiqbalpk Fixed the example, that way you're not avoiding using global variables. –  Deleteman Apr 24 '12 at 13:55

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