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First let me mention that I've gone through many suggested questions and found no relevent answer. Here is what I'm doing.

I'm connected to my Amazon EC2 instance. I can login with MySQL root with this command:

mysql -u root -p

Then I created a new user bill with host %

CREATE USER 'bill'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'passpass';

Granted all the privileges to user bill:

grant all privileges on . to 'bill'@'%' with grant option;

Then I exit from root user and try to login with bill:

mysql -u bill -p

entered the correct password and got this error:

ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'bill'@'localhost' (using password: YES)

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I think that will log you on as 'bill'@'localhost' which is probably not what you want. –  Jeremy Holovacs Apr 24 '12 at 13:45
5  
Did you FLUSH PRIVILEGES? –  eggyal Apr 24 '12 at 14:10
    
Nope. Let me try that –  Ali Apr 24 '12 at 14:15
    
Okay, I tried this without any success. Any other suggestion please. –  Ali Apr 25 '12 at 4:35
    
Any help guys ?? –  Ali Apr 25 '12 at 6:13

16 Answers 16

up vote 152 down vote accepted

You probably have an anonymous user ''@'localhost' or ''@'127.0.0.1'.

As per the manual:

When multiple matches are possible, the server must determine which of them to use. It resolves this issue as follows: (...)

  • When a client attempts to connect, the server looks through the rows [of table mysql.user] in sorted order.
  • The server uses the first row that matches the client host name and user name.

(...) The server uses sorting rules that order rows with the most-specific Host values first. Literal host names [such as 'localhost'] and IP addresses are the most specific.

Hence, such an anonymous user would "mask" any other user like '[any_username]'@'%' when connecting from localhost.

'bill'@'localhost' does match 'bill'@'%', but would match (e.g.) ''@'localhost' beforehands.

The recommended solution is to drop this anonymous user (this is usually a good thing to do anyways).


Below edits are mostly irrelevant to the main question. These are only meant to answer some questions raised in other comments within this thread.

[edit 1: authenticating as 'bill'@'%' through a socket]


    root@myhost:/home/mysql-5.5.16-linux2.6-x86_64# ./mysql -ubill -ppass --socket=/tmp/mysql-5.5.sock
    Welcome to the MySQL monitor (...)

    mysql> SELECT user, host FROM mysql.user;
    +------+-----------+
    | user | host      |
    +------+-----------+
    | bill | %         |
    | root | 127.0.0.1 |
    | root | ::1       |
    | root | localhost |
    +------+-----------+
    4 rows in set (0.00 sec)

    mysql> SELECT USER(), CURRENT_USER();
    +----------------+----------------+
    | USER()         | CURRENT_USER() |
    +----------------+----------------+
    | bill@localhost | bill@%         |
    +----------------+----------------+
    1 row in set (0.02 sec)

    mysql> SHOW VARIABLES LIKE 'skip_networking';
    +-----------------+-------+
    | Variable_name   | Value |
    +-----------------+-------+
    | skip_networking | ON    |
    +-----------------+-------+
    1 row in set (0.00 sec)

[edit 2: exact same setup, except I re-activated networking, and I now create an anonymous user ''@'localhost']


    root@myhost:/home/mysql-5.5.16-linux2.6-x86_64# ./mysql
    Welcome to the MySQL monitor (...)

    mysql> CREATE USER ''@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'anotherpass';
    Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

    mysql> Bye

    root@myhost:/home/mysql-5.5.16-linux2.6-x86_64# ./mysql -ubill -ppass \
        --socket=/tmp/mysql-5.5.sock
    ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'bill'@'localhost' (using password: YES)
    root@myhost:/home/mysql-5.5.16-linux2.6-x86_64# ./mysql -ubill -ppass \
        -h127.0.0.1 --protocol=TCP
    ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'bill'@'localhost' (using password: YES)
    root@myhost:/home/mysql-5.5.16-linux2.6-x86_64# ./mysql -ubill -ppass \
        -hlocalhost --protocol=TCP
    ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'bill'@'localhost' (using password: YES)

[edit 3: same situation as in edit 2, now providing the anonymous user's password]


    root@myhost:/home/mysql-5.5.16-linux2.6-x86_64# ./mysql -ubill -panotherpass -hlocalhost
    Welcome to the MySQL monitor (...)

    mysql> SELECT USER(), CURRENT_USER();
    +----------------+----------------+
    | USER()         | CURRENT_USER() |
    +----------------+----------------+
    | bill@localhost | @localhost     |
    +----------------+----------------+
    1 row in set (0.01 sec)

Conclusion 1, from [edit 1]: One can authenticate as 'bill'@'%'through a socket

Conclusion 2, from [edit 2]: whether one connects through TCP or through a socket has no impact on the authentication process (except one cannot connect as anyone else but 'something'@'localhost' through a socket, obviously).

Conclusion 3, from [edit 3]: although I specified -ubill, I have been granted access as an anonymous user. This is because of the "sorting rules" advised above. Notice that in most default installations, a no-password, anonymous user exists (and should be secured/removed).

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5  
THANK YOU! It was driving me crazy! –  Lefteris E May 22 '13 at 8:39
3  
For anyone curious as to why 'bill'@'localhost' matches ''@'localhost' like I was, an empty string effectively acts a wild card in MySQL's authentication algorithm. –  Dean Or Aug 6 '13 at 4:14
1  
@Sanja Be extra careful with this workaround. You may be allowing anonymous access to your database from any location. In case of doubt, I would rather delete the user. –  RandomSeed Oct 3 '13 at 14:30
1  
@RandomSeed Thank you for this comment! Probably I should just delete anonymous user. P.S. I found dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/default-privileges.html that says that these users surely can be deleted: DROP USER ''@'localhost';. They are not needed for some special purpose. –  Sanja Oct 3 '13 at 15:33
1  
@Ali Why not choose this as best answer? –  dspjm Mar 6 at 15:17

Try:

~$ mysql -u root -p
Enter Password:

mysql> grant all privileges on *.* to bill@localhost identified by 'pass' with grant option;
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1  
with gran option :-) –  case1352 Oct 25 '12 at 20:40
    
This IS the ANSWER! –  JoseE Mar 19 '13 at 16:53
    
Its very well working for me..Its cool :) –  minhas23 Dec 31 '13 at 12:09
    
This is rather dangerous, if someone hacks your bill@localhost mysql account, he will have infinite access to all the databases of your mysql server. –  Adonis K. Feb 18 at 21:30
    
Whehey. I had to put quote around my user 'myusername'@'myhost.static.myip.com' then it worked. –  bendecko Mar 22 at 14:14

When you ran

mysql -u bill -p

and got this error

ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'bill'@'localhost' (using password: YES)

mysqld is expecting you to connect as bill@localhost

Try creating bill@localhost

CREATE USER bill@localhost IDENTIFIED BY 'passpass';
grant all privileges on *.* to bill@localhost with grant option;

If you want to connect remotely, you must specify either the DNS name, the public IP, or 127.0.0.1 using TCP/IP:

mysql -u bill -p -hmydb@mydomain.com
mysql -u bill -p -h10.1.2.30
mysql -u bill -p -h127.0.0.1 --protocol=TCP

Once you login, please run this

SELECT USER(),CURRENT_USER();

USER() reports how you attempted to authenticate in MySQL

CURRENT_USER() reports how you were allowed to authenticate in MySQL from the mysql.user table

This will give you a better view of how and why you were allowed to login to mysql. Why is this view important to know? It has to do with the user authentication ordering protocol.

Here is an example: I will create an anonymous user on my desktop MySQL

mysql> select user,host from mysql.user;
+---------+-----------+
| user    | host      |
+---------+-----------+
| lwdba   | %         |
| mywife  | %         |
| lwdba   | 127.0.0.1 |
| root    | 127.0.0.1 |
| lwdba   | localhost |
| root    | localhost |
| vanilla | localhost |
+---------+-----------+
7 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> grant all on *.* to x@'%';
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.02 sec)

mysql> select user,host from mysql.user;
+---------+-----------+
| user    | host      |
+---------+-----------+
| lwdba   | %         |
| mywife  | %         |
| x       | %         |
| lwdba   | 127.0.0.1 |
| root    | 127.0.0.1 |
| lwdba   | localhost |
| root    | localhost |
| vanilla | localhost |
+---------+-----------+
8 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> update mysql.user set user='' where user='x';
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)
Rows matched: 1  Changed: 1  Warnings: 0

mysql> flush privileges;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.01 sec)

mysql> select user,host from mysql.user;
+---------+-----------+
| user    | host      |
+---------+-----------+
|         | %         |
| lwdba   | %         |
| mywife  | %         |
| lwdba   | 127.0.0.1 |
| root    | 127.0.0.1 |
| lwdba   | localhost |
| root    | localhost |
| vanilla | localhost |
+---------+-----------+
8 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql>

OK watch me login as anonymous user:

C:\MySQL_5.5.12>mysql -urol -Dtest -h127.0.0.1 --protocol=TCP
Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 12
Server version: 5.5.12-log MySQL Community Server (GPL)

Copyright (c) 2000, 2010, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its
affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
owners.

Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.

mysql> select user(),current_user();
+---------------+----------------+
| user()        | current_user() |
+---------------+----------------+
| rol@localhost | @%             |
+---------------+----------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql>

Authentication ordering is very strict. It checks from the most specific to the least. I wrote about this authentiation style in the DBA StackExchange.

Don't forget to explicitly call for TCP as the protocol for mysql client when necessary.

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1  
'bill'@'localhost' should match 'bill@%', shouldn't it? –  RandomSeed Jun 26 '12 at 23:02
    
@Yak the sort order is not based solely on mysql.user's user column. MySQL does not do any character matching per se. I wrote about the user authentication ordering protocol in the DBA StackExchange : dba.stackexchange.com/a/10897/877 –  RolandoMySQLDBA Jun 26 '12 at 23:09
    
@YaK This is why I specifically mentioned SELECT USER(),CURRENT_USER();. You almost never see anonymous users appear from these two functions except in really poor setups. –  RolandoMySQLDBA Jun 26 '12 at 23:18
    
I never assumed the sort order is based solely on mysql.user. In fact, if you read my answer again, you will see that I said (actually, the manual says) the sort order is based on the host column first. You wrote a lot about how to check your current credentials, but I see little information as to why 'bill'@'localhost' cannot login as 'bill'@'%', which is today's question AFAIK. The OP probably has a poor setup, this is why he gets these errors. –  RandomSeed Jun 27 '12 at 7:28
    
Note that in default "binary" installations, an anonymous user ''@'localhost' exists before you run the "Post-installation" procedure. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/default-privileges.html –  RandomSeed Jun 27 '12 at 7:29

When you type mysql -u root -p , you're connecting to the mysql server over a local unix socket.

However the grant you gave, 'bill'@'%' only matches TCP/IP connections curiously enough.

If you want to grant access to the local unix socket, you need to grant privileges to 'bill'@'localhost' , which curiously enough is not the same as 'bill'@'127.0.0.1'

You could also connect using TCP/IP with the mysql command line client, as to match the privileges you already granted, e.g. run mysql -u root -p -h 192.168.1.123 or whichever local IP address your box have.

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"'bill'@'%' only matches TCP/IP connections" This is wrong. Try it on a clean (virgin, out-of-the-box) instance with skip-networking –  RandomSeed Jun 26 '12 at 22:26
    
@YaK I cannot get 'user'@'%' to function in such a setup, what do you mean was supposed to happen ? –  nos Jun 27 '12 at 6:09
    
I could connect as 'bill'@'%' on a v5.0 without networking (hence, through a socket). What version are you using? I will try it on a v5.5. –  RandomSeed Jun 27 '12 at 6:39
    
Please see my updated answer. I was able to login as 'bill'@'%' through a socket on a v5.5. –  RandomSeed Jun 27 '12 at 7:17

I can't believe that the solution was as simple as deleting the anonymous (Any) user!

I also faced the same issue on a server setup by someone else. I normally don't choose to create an anonymous user upon installing MySQL, so hadn't noticed this. Initially I logged in as "root" user and created a couple of "normal" users (aka users with privileges only on dbs with their username as prefix), then logged out, then went on to verify the first normal user. I couldn't log in. Neither via phpMyAdmin, nor via shell. Turns out, the culprit is this "Any" user.

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This ought to be a comment, not an answer. –  Hugo Oct 5 at 23:08
    
Thanks! This is it! –  OliverKK Oct 20 at 23:07

Save yourself of a MAJOR headache... Your problem might be that you are missing the quotes around the password. At least that was my case that detoured me for 3 hours.

[client]
user = myusername
password = "mypassword"   # <----------------------- VERY IMPORTANT (quotes)
host = localhost

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/option-files.html

Search for "Here is a typical user option file:" and see the example they state in there. Good luck, and I hope to save someone else some time.

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A related problem in my case was trying to connect using :

mysql -u mike -p mypass

Whitespace IS apparently allowed between the -u #uname# but NOT between the -p and #password#

Therefore needed:

mysql -u mike -pmypass

Otherwise with white-space between -p mypass mysql takes 'mypass' as the db name

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Okay, I'm not sure but probably this is my.cnf file inside mysql installation directory is the culprit. Comment out this line and the problem might be resolved.

bind-address = 127.0.0.1
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For more details, you can view this as well wiki.bitnami.org/Components/MySQL –  Ali Apr 25 '12 at 10:33
    
I am quite sure that this is not the issue. If it would be, MySQL refuses connections from any host other than 127.0.0.1, and you will not get a SQL 'Access Denied' error. –  Pelle ten Cate Jun 27 '12 at 7:38

MySQL account names consist of a user name and a host name, The name 'localhost' in host name indicates the local host also You can use the wildcard characters “%” and “_” in host name or IP address values. These have the same meaning as for pattern-matching operations performed with the LIKE operator. For example, a host value of '%' matches any host name, whereas a value of '%.mysql.com' matches any host in the mysql.com domain. '192.168.1.%' matches any host in the 192.168.1 class C network.

Above was just introduction:

actually both users 'bill'@'localhost' and 'bill'@'%' are different MySQL accounts, hence both should use their own authentication details like password.

For more information refer http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman//5.5/en/account-names.html

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Re: mySQL ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost

I hope you have not done more damage by also deleting the debian-sys-maint user in mysql

Have your mysql daemon running the normal way. Start your mysql client as shown below

mysql -u debian-sys-maint -p

In another terminal, 'cat' the file /etc/mysql/debian.cnf. That file contains a password; paste that password when prompted for it.

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1836919

Good luck.

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When you run mysql -u bill -p, localhost is resolved to your ip, since it is 127.0.0.1 and in your /etc/hosts file, as default 127.0.0.1 localhost exists. So, mysql interprets you as bill@localhost which is not granted with bill@'%' . This is why there are 2 different records for root user in result of select host, user from mysql.user; query.

There are two ways to handle this issue.

One is specifying an ip which is not reversely resolved by /etc/hosts file when you try to login. For example, the ip of server is 10.0.0.2. When you run the command mysql -u bill -p -h 10.0.0.2, you will be able to login. If you type select user();, you will get bill@10.0.0.2. Of course, any domain name should not be resolved to this ip in your /etc/hosts file.

Secondly, you need grant access for this specific domain name. For bill@localhost, you should call command grant all privileges on *.* to bill@localhost identified by 'billpass'; . In this case, you will be able to login with command mysql -u bill -p. Once logined, select user(); command returns bill@localhost.

But this is only for that you try to login a mysql server in the same host. From remote hosts, mysql behaves expectedly, '%' will grant you to login.

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Be sure there are no other SQL instances running that are using the localhost post. In our case another instance was running on the localhost that conflicted with the login. Turning it off solved this problem.

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I resolved this by deleting the old buggy user 'bill' entries (this is the important part: both from mysql.user and mysql.db), then created the same user as sad before:

FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
CREATE USER bill@localhost IDENTIFIED BY 'passpass';
grant all privileges on *.* to bill@localhost with grant option;
FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Worked, user is connecting. Now I'll remove some previlegies from it :)

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Also the problem can occur if you are using old version of the MySQL UI (like SQLYoug) that generates passwords with wrong hash.

Creating user with SQL script will fix the problem.

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I had the same problem, but in my case the solution was solved by the comment by eggyal. I had an anonymous user as well, but removing it didn't solve the problem. The 'FLUSH PRIVILEGES' command worked though.

The surprising thing to me about this was that I created the user with MySQL Workbench and I would have expected that to perform all of the necessary functions to complete the task.

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The best solution i found for myself is.

my user is sonar and whenever i am trying to connect to my database from external or other machine i am getting error as

ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'sonar'@'localhost' (using password: YES)

Also as i am trying this from another machine and through Jenkins job my URL for accessing is

alm-lt-test.xyz.com

if you want to connect remotely you can specify it with different ways as follows:

mysql -u sonar -p -halm-lt-test.xyz.com
mysql -u sonar -p -h101.33.65.94
mysql -u sonar -p -h127.0.0.1 --protocol=TCP
mysql -u sonar -p -h172.27.59.54 --protocol=TCP

To access this with URL you just have to execute the following query.

GRANT ALL ON sonar.* TO 'sonar'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'sonar';
GRANT ALL ON sonar.* TO 'sonar'@'alm-lt-test.xyz.com' IDENTIFIED BY 'sonar';
GRANT ALL ON sonar.* TO 'sonar'@'127.0.0.1' IDENTIFIED BY 'sonar';
GRANT ALL ON sonar.* TO 'sonar'@'172.27.59.54' IDENTIFIED BY 'sonar';
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