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I am writing something that is similar to a task scheduler. I have two sets of tasks, some which are fixed (they are given a start and end date and time) and some which are not fixed (they are given a start date and time and a duration).

The non-fixed tasks are influenced by the fixed tasks, so that if a non-fixed task is overlapped by a fixed task, the non-fixed task will extend its duration by the amount of overlap.

I start with a list of tuples where the first item is the starting date and the second item is the ID for that fixed task, like this:

[(2012-04-30, 1), (2012-05-01, 5), (2012-05-04, 2)]

I then have another list, which is ordered by the user, of the non-fixed tasks. The idea is that I'll loop through this list, and inside of that loop I'll loop through the first list to find the tasks that could overlap with this task, and can figure out which how much to extend the non-fixed task.

Here is where I'm asking for your help. Now that I know the calculated start and end times of this non-fixed task, I need to consider it "fixed" so that it influences the rest of the non-fixed tasks.

I can add this task to the first list of fixed tasks and sort it again, but that means that I'm sorting the list every time I add a task to it.

I can loop through the first list and find the point where this task should be inserted, and then insert it there. But, if its place is early in the list, time is spent shifting all of the other items one place. And if its place is late in the list, I would have to loop through a lot of elements to reach the correct place.

So, I'm not sold on using either of those options. The real question here is: What's the best way to keep a list sorted while adding things to it? Or is there a much better way of doing all of this?

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1  
Keep in mind that a good sorting algorithm (such as Timsort used by Python) won't need to do a lot of extra work if you're sorting data that's mostly already sorted. –  Michael Mior Apr 24 '12 at 14:14
4  
How about bisect module docs.python.org/library/bisect.html ? –  Fenikso Apr 24 '12 at 14:30
    
@MichaelMior Everything would be sorted except for the last element. –  STH Apr 24 '12 at 14:39
    
@Fenikso by reading the overview, it sounds like that could be a library that I would use. Is there any comparison of that vs. another approach? I'd like to know how fast it is comparatively. –  STH Apr 24 '12 at 14:42
    
@STH - Sorry, I have never used it, I have heard of it just recently and your question rang the bell. It should just implement Insert Sort. It should do O(log n) binary search and O(n) insertion. –  Fenikso Apr 24 '12 at 14:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is the example of using bisect and comparison with using the sort of the partially sorted list. The bisect solution clearly wins:

import bisect
import random
import timeit


def bisect_solution(size=10000):
    lst = []
    for n in xrange(size):
        value = random.randint(1, 1000000)
        bisect.insort_left(lst, value)
    return lst


# Cut out of the bisect module to be used in bisect_solution2()
def insort_left(a, x, lo=0, hi=None):
    """Insert item x in list a, and keep it sorted assuming a is sorted.

    If x is already in a, insert it to the left of the leftmost x.

    Optional args lo (default 0) and hi (default len(a)) bound the
    slice of a to be searched.
    """

    if lo < 0:
        raise ValueError('lo must be non-negative')
    if hi is None:
        hi = len(a)
    while lo < hi:
        mid = (lo+hi)//2
        if a[mid] < x: lo = mid+1
        else: hi = mid
    a.insert(lo, x)


def bisect_solution2(size=10000):
    lst = []
    for n in xrange(size):
        value = random.randint(1, 1000000)
        insort_left(lst, value)
    return lst


def sort_solution(size=10000):
    lst = []
    for n in xrange(size):
        value = random.randint(1, 1000000)
        lst.append(value)
        lst.sort()
    return lst


t = timeit.timeit('bisect_solution()', 'from __main__ import bisect_solution', number = 10)
print "bisect_solution: ", t

t = timeit.timeit('bisect_solution2()', 'from __main__ import bisect_solution2', number = 10)
print "bisect_solution2: ", t

t = timeit.timeit('sort_solution()', 'from __main__ import sort_solution', number = 10)
print "sort_solution: ", t

The bisect_solution2() is almost the same as bisect_solution() -- only with the code copied-out of the module. Someone else should explain why it takes more time :)

The bisect_solution2() is here to be modified for cmp() function to be able to compare the tuples.

It shows the following results on my computer:

bisect_solution:  0.637892403587
bisect_solution2:  0.988893038133
sort_solution:  15.3521410901

Here is a bisect solution adopted for the tuples where date is a string:

import random
import timeit


def random_date_tuple():
    s1 = '{0}-{1:02}-{2:02}'.format(random.randint(2000, 2050),
                                    random.randint(1, 12),
                                    random.randint(1, 31))
    e2 = random.randint(1,50)
    return (s1, e2)


def my_cmp(a, b):
    result = cmp(a[0], b[0])   # comparing the date part of the tuple
    if result == 0:
        return cmp(a[1], b[1]) # comparint the other part of the tuple
    return result


def my_insort_left(a, x, cmp=my_cmp, lo=0, hi=None):
    """The bisect.insort_left() modified for comparison of tuples."""

    if lo < 0:
        raise ValueError('lo must be non-negative')
    if hi is None:
        hi = len(a)
    while lo < hi:
        mid = (lo+hi)//2
        if cmp(a[mid], x) < 0: 
            lo = mid+1
        else: 
            hi = mid
    a.insert(lo, x)


def bisect_solution3(size=1000):
    lst = []
    for n in xrange(size):
        value = random_date_tuple()
        my_insort_left(lst, value)
    return lst


def sort_solution(size=1000):
    lst = []
    for n in xrange(size):
        value = random_date_tuple()
        lst.append(value)
        lst.sort(cmp=my_cmp)
    return lst


t = timeit.timeit('bisect_solution3()', 'from __main__ import bisect_solution3', number = 10)
print "bisect_solution3: ", t

t = timeit.timeit('sort_solution()', 'from __main__ import sort_solution', number = 10)
print "sort_solution: ", t

print bisect_solution3()[:10]

Notice that the list size is 10 times less than in the previous as the sort solution was very slow. It prints:

bisect_solution3:  0.223602245968
sort_solution:  3.69388944301
[('2000-02-01', 20), ('2000-02-13', 48), ('2000-03-11', 25), ('2000-03-13', 43),
 ('2000-03-26', 48), ('2000-05-04', 17), ('2000-06-06', 23), ('2000-06-12', 31),
 ('2000-06-15', 15), ('2000-07-07', 50)]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the demonstration. –  STH Apr 24 '12 at 15:44
1  
+1 for timed example. BTW: bisect.insort_left is probably implemented in C in CPython - that's why it is faster. –  Fenikso Apr 24 '12 at 16:01
    
@Fenikso: You are right. You can find the module it in your /usr/lib/python2.6/bisect.py or C:\Python26\Lib\bisect.py (or the like for Python 2.7, or Python 3.2). It is quite short. You can find the # Overwrite above definitions with a fast C implementation and the command that imports it from the _bisect module (notice the underscore). But in that case, the .py implementation is not that bad at all! –  pepr Apr 24 '12 at 19:07

The real question here is: What's the best way to keep a list sorted while adding things to it?

Insertion Sort is the way to go. But you might not like it as have already know this. The next thing you can do is this,

  1. Dont sort while adding.
  2. When you get the items sort it and cache it. When its requested next time Show from previous cache.
  3. Invalidate the cache when any new items is added.

I am not a python programmer But I can give you some idea with a PHP class.

class SortedList(){
    public $list = array();
    private $cached_list;

    public function add($item){
        array_push($this->list, $item);
        $this->sorted = false;
    }
    public function get(){
        if($this->sorted==true){
            return $this->cached_list;
        }

        // sort the array;

        // copying the list to cached list and sort it
        $this->cached_list = $this->list;
        sort($this->cached_list);

        // set the flag
        $this->sorted = true;
        return $this->cached_list
    }

}
share|improve this answer

I can loop through the first list and find the point where this task should be inserted, and then insert it there. But, if its place is early in the list, time is spent shifting all of the other items one place. And if its place is late in the list, I would have to loop through a lot of elements to reach the correct place.

Finding the right place to insert something into a sorted list can be done in O(log n) using binary search. Inserting would still be O(n).

There are more complicated data structures like B-Trees that allow inserting and searching in O(log n). Have a look at this and this.

share|improve this answer
    
This is based on theory that every memory access takes the same time. The reality is different. Processors have big caches, complicated graph structures may cause memory-page faults... –  pepr Apr 24 '12 at 15:07
1  
If I'm looking for a drop-in replacement for a list in this case, then I would definitely go with the 'blist' option you provided. It seems to be comparable and/or faster than a normal list in each case: stutzbachenterprises.com/performance-blist –  STH Apr 24 '12 at 15:09

A Heap Queue is your friend. From Wikipedia:

The operations commonly performed with a heap are:

  • create-heap: create an empty heap
  • find-max: find the maximum item of a max-heap
  • delete-max: removing the root node of a max-heap
  • increase-key: updating a key within a max-heap
  • insert: adding a new key to the heap
  • merge: joining two heaps to form a valid new heap containing all the elements of both.

There is a builtin Python Heap Queue implementation. Heaps are optimized for 1) removing the max element, 2) inserting new elements to maintain the heap ordering.

share|improve this answer
    
But scanning through the heap to find overlapping "fixed" tasks is still expensive. Even more expensive than with a sorted list. –  user1346466 Apr 24 '12 at 14:34
    
This would work but it sounds like with heaps you are primarily pushing and popping, but I wouldn't want to pop off the heap at any time because the tasks wouldn't leave the system (unless deleted). –  STH Apr 24 '12 at 15:04

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