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I have a file with a list, and a need to make a file that compares each line to the other. for example, my file has this:

AAA  
BBB  
CCC  
DDD  
EEE

I would like the final list to look like this:

AAA  BBB  
AAA  CCC  
AAA  DDD  
AAA  EEE  
BBB  CCC  
BBB  DDD  
BBB  EEE  
CCC  DDD  
CCC  EEE  
DDD  EEE

I am trying to do this in Perl, for this first time and am having a little trouble. I do know that you need to make an array, and then split it, but after that I am having some trouble.

share|improve this question
    
Please post your so far code. –  tuxuday Apr 24 '12 at 14:26
    
what have you tried so far? –  Nikhil Jain Apr 24 '12 at 14:26

7 Answers 7

Use Algorithm::Combinatorics. The iterator based approach is preferable to generating everything at once.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;
use Algorithm::Combinatorics qw(combinations);

my $strings = [qw(AAA BBB CCC DDD EEE)];

my $iter = combinations($strings, 2);

while (my $c = $iter->next) {
    print "@$c\n";
}

Output:

AAA BBB
AAA CCC
AAA DDD
AAA EEE
BBB CCC
BBB DDD
BBB EEE
CCC DDD
CCC EEE
DDD EEE
share|improve this answer

Take a look at Math::Combinatorics - Perform combinations and permutations on lists

example copying from the CPAN:

use Math::Combinatorics;

  my @n = qw(a b c);
  my $combinat = Math::Combinatorics->new(count => 2,
                                          data => [@n],
                                         );

  print "combinations of 2 from: ".join(" ",@n)."\n";
  print "------------------------".("--" x scalar(@n))."\n";
  while(my @combo = $combinat->next_combination){
    print join(' ', @combo)."\n";
  }

  print "\n";

  print "permutations of 3 from: ".join(" ",@n)."\n";
  print "------------------------".("--" x scalar(@n))."\n";
  while(my @permu = $combinat->next_permutation){
    print join(' ', @permu)."\n";
  }

  output:
combinations of 2 from: a b c
  ------------------------------
  a b
  a c
  b c

  permutations of 3 from: a b c
  ------------------------------
  a b c
  a c b
  b a c
  b c a
  c a b
  c b a
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3  
Why don't you use the example data from the question? –  daxim Apr 24 '12 at 14:54
1  
@daxim: Intension was to left some work for OP. –  Nikhil Jain Apr 25 '12 at 5:48

It is straightforward to write this using recursion.

This code example demonstrates.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $strings = [qw(AAA BBB CCC DDD EEE)];

sub combine;

print "@$_\n" for combine $strings, 5;

sub combine {

  my ($list, $n) = @_;
  die "Insufficient list members" if $n > @$list;

  return map [$_], @$list if $n <= 1;

  my @comb;

  for my $i (0 .. $#$list) {
    my @rest = @$list;
    my $val  = splice @rest, $i, 1;
    push @comb, [$val, @$_] for combine \@rest, $n-1;
  }

  return @comb;
}

Edit

My apologies - I was generating permutations instead of combinations.

This code is correct.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $strings = [qw(AAA BBB CCC DDD EEE)];

sub combine;

print "@$_\n" for combine $strings, 2;

sub combine {

  my ($list, $n) = @_;
  die "Insufficient list members" if $n > @$list;

  return map [$_], @$list if $n <= 1;

  my @comb;

  for (my $i = 0; $i+$n <= @$list; ++$i) {
    my $val  = $list->[$i];
    my @rest = @$list[$i+1..$#$list];
    push @comb, [$val, @$_] for combine \@rest, $n-1;
  }

  return @comb;
}

output

AAA BBB
AAA CCC
AAA DDD
AAA EEE
BBB CCC
BBB DDD
BBB EEE
CCC DDD
CCC EEE
DDD EEE
share|improve this answer
  1. take first string
  2. iterate over array from next position to end
    1. attach next string to original string
  3. take next string and go back to step 2
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This should do what you want, given that the lines are in the array @list and the output will be stored in @result.

my @result;
foreach my $a (0..$#list) {
    foreach my $b ($a+1..$#list) {
        push @result, $list[$a] . $list[$b];
    }
}
share|improve this answer

How about:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dump qw(dump);

my @in = qw(AAA BBB CCC DDD EEE);
my @list;
while(my $first = shift @in) {
    last unless @in;
    my $rest = join',',@in;
    push @list, glob("{$first}{$rest}");
}
dump @list;

output:

(
  "AAABBB",
  "AAACCC",
  "AAADDD",
  "AAAEEE",
  "BBBCCC",
  "BBBDDD",
  "BBBEEE",
  "CCCDDD",
  "CCCEEE",
  "DDDEEE",
)
share|improve this answer
5  
The glob trick should always be accompanied by the various caveats for when it fails. –  daxim Apr 24 '12 at 14:51
    
@daxim: Do you mean the "side-effect" of matching files in the current working directory? If so, isn't this perfectly safe since he's not using ?, [] or *? –  flesk Apr 25 '12 at 6:22
    
All of that. I am annoyed now, the caveats should be clearly laid out as part of the answer, not rhetoric questions attached as a comment with low visibility. It's not a "side-effect", it really happens, modalising the word is wrong. It's not safe: obviously the user provided made-up/anonymised data in the question and will be in for a bad surprise under real world conditions. SO answers should strive to not set people up for failure, they should be always aware of subtleties and risks; given that, I have now downvoted this answer to give M42 an incentive to improve it. -- continued: –  daxim Apr 25 '12 at 7:40
    
I recommend Text::Glob::Expand or String::Glob::Permute over plain glob, if only that the documentation is better and they do the manipulation on in-memory data structures, not influenced by external factors like the shell or what's in the current directory. –  daxim Apr 25 '12 at 7:40
2  
@daxim: That's a good point. Quoting side-effect was meant as a joke though: I agree that SO isn't the best place to be teaching these kinds of tricks. –  flesk Apr 26 '12 at 6:58

Here's a hack using glob:

my @list = qw(AAA BBB CCC DDD EEE);

for my $i (0..$#list-1) {
    print join "\n", glob sprintf "{'$list[$i] '}{%s}", join ",", @list[$i+1..$#list];
    print "\n";
}

The output:

AAA BBB
AAA CCC
AAA DDD
AAA EEE
BBB CCC
BBB DDD
BBB EEE
CCC DDD
CCC EEE
DDD EEE
share|improve this answer
3  
The glob trick should always be accompanied by the various caveats for when it fails. –  daxim Apr 24 '12 at 15:15

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