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I have two lists, A and B, with an equal number of elements, although the elements in each list are not necessarily distinct.

I would like to form a new list by coupling the elements from A and B at random (the random pairing is important).

However, I also need to make sure that each pair in the resulting list is unique.

So far, I've been approaching the problem as follows, which works for small lists, but clearly is not suited to larger lists with many combinations.

from random import shuffle

# Create a list of actors and events for testing
events = ['P1','P1','P1','P2','P2','P2','P3','P3','P3','P4','P5','P6','P7','P7']
actors = ['IE','IE','ID','ID','IA','IA','IA','IC','IB','IF','IG','IH','IH','IA']

# Randomize the elements of each list
shuffle(events)
shuffle(actors)

# Merge the two lists into a new list of pairs
edgelist = zip(events,actors)

# If the new list of pairs has all unique elements, then it is a good solution, otherwise try again at random
x = set(edgelist)

if len(edgelist) == len(x):
  break
else:
  while True:
    shuffle(events)
    shuffle(actors)
    edgelist = zip(events,actors)
    x = set(edgelist)
    if len(edgelist) == len(x):
      break

# Display the solution
print 'Solution obtained: '
for item in edgelist:
  print item

Can anyone suggest a modification or alternative approach that would scale to larger input lists?

Thanks for the helpful replies.

Update

Turns out this is a more challenging problem than originally thought. I think I now have a solution. It may not scale incredibly well but works fine for small or medium sized lists. It checks to see whether a solution is possible before starting, so assumptions about the distribution of the input lists aren't necessary. I also included a few lines of code to show that the frequency distributions of the resulting list match the original.

# Randomize the elements
shuffle(events)

# Make sure a solution is possible
combinations = len(set(events))*len(set(actors))
assert combinations >= len(events) and combinations >= len(actors) and len(events) == len(actors), 'No soluton possible!'

# Merge the two lists into a new list of pairs (this will contain duplicates)
edgelist = zip(events,actors)

# Search for duplicates
counts = collections.Counter(edgelist)
duplicates = [i for i in counts if counts[i] > 1]
duplicate_count = len(duplicates)

while duplicate_count > 0:

  # Get a single duplicate to address
  duplicate = duplicates[0]

  # Find the position of the duplicate in the in edgelist
  duplicate_pos = edgelist.index(duplicate)

  # Search for a replacement
  swap = choice(edgelist)
  swap_pos = edgelist.index(swap)

  if (swap[0],duplicate[1]) not in edgelist: 
    edgelist[duplicate_pos] = (swap[0],duplicate[1])
    edgelist[swap_pos] = (duplicate[0],swap[1])

  # Update duplicate count
  counts = collections.Counter(edgelist)
  duplicates = [i for i in counts if counts[i] > 1]
  duplicate_count = len(duplicates)


# Verify resulting edgelist and frequency distributions

print 'Event Frequencies: '
print sorted([y for (x,y) in list(collections.Counter(events).items())], reverse=True)

print 'Edgelist Event Frequencies: '        
print sorted([y for (x,y) in list(collections.Counter([x for (x,y) in edgelist]).items())], reverse=True)

print 'Actor Frequencies: '        
print sorted([y for (x,y) in list(collections.Counter(actors).items())], reverse=True)

print 'Edgelist Actor Frequencies: '        
print sorted([y for (x,y) in list(collections.Counter([y for (x,y) in edgelist]).items())], reverse=True)

assert len(set(edgelist)) == len(events) == len(actors)
share|improve this question
1  
If you use a set for "edgelist", the lookup that you have to do on every pair you try will be a lot faster. –  rbp Apr 27 '12 at 9:55
    
I think you need to add the information about the input data you had in your 2nd update -- it's essential information. –  martineau Apr 27 '12 at 15:09
    
@martineau I posted a new solution that will won't run if these assumptions aren't met, to make the answer more general. –  rjf Apr 27 '12 at 19:12
    
@sail3005 There are still some serious problems with your updated solution. 1) by choosing a random element to swap, you're not gaining any randomness, but it can happen that you never reach a solution, even when there is one. 2) everytime you use Counter and "pair not in edgelist", you're sweeping the full array. And, since you do this an unpredictable number of times (because of the use of "choice"), it's hard to even tell how this performs. I've updated my answer with a recursive version that's guaranteed to find a solution, if there is one. Please take a look. –  rbp Apr 29 '12 at 18:12
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, there is no reason for you to shuffle both lists. The pairing will not get "more random".

Update: I've posted a different solution than my original one. It's recursive, and is guaranteed to always return a valid answer, or None if one is not possible.

from random import shuffle

def merge(events, actors, index=None):
    """Returns list of unique pairs of events and actors, none of which may on index"""
    if len(events) == 0:
        return []
    if index is None:
        index = set()

    merged = None
    tried_pairs = set()
    for event in events:
        for i, actor in enumerate(actors):
            pair = (event, actor)
            if pair not in index and pair not in tried_pairs:
                new_index = index.union([pair])
                rest = merge(events[1:], actors[:i]+actors[i+1:], new_index)

                if rest is not None:
                    # Found! Done.
                    merged = [pair] + rest
                    break
                else:
                    tried_pairs.add(pair)
        if merged is not None:
            break

    return merged


if __name__ == '__main__':
    _events = ['P1','P1','P1','P2','P2','P2','P3','P3','P3','P4','P5','P6','P7','P7']
    _actors = ['IE','IE','ID','ID','IA','IA','IA','IC','IB','IF','IG','IH','IH','IA']
    shuffle(_events)
    edgelist = merge(_events, _actors)

    if edgelist is not None:
        print 'Solution obtained: '
        for item in edgelist:
            print item
    else:
        print 'No possible solution with these events and actors.'

Note: the "index" variable is similar to checking edgelist, on the OP's solution. The "tried_pairs" variable is just an optimisation for each specific recursion step, to avoid retrying the same pair over and over again (if, for instance, there are several consecutive identical items in actors).

share|improve this answer
    
Great. I like the addition of the tried pairs approach. –  rjf Apr 30 '12 at 10:23
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This seems to work OK, however I'm not completely sure how well it will scale...

# Create tuples of lists of actors and events for testing
testcases = [
    (['P1','P1','P1','P2','P2','P2','P3','P3','P3','P4','P5','P6','P7','P7'],
     ['IE','IE','ID','ID','IA','IA','IA','IC','IB','IF','IG','IH','IH','IA']),

    (['P1','P1','P1','P1','P1','P1','P1','P2','P2','P2','P2','P2','P2','P2'],
     ['IE','IE','IE','IE','IE','IE','IE','ID','ID','ID','ID','ID','ID','ID']),

    (['P1','P2','P3','P4','P5','P6','P7','P8','P9','PA','PB','PC','PD','PE'],
     ['IE','IE','IE','IE','IE','IE','IE','ID','ID','ID','ID','ID','ID','ID']),
]

events, actors = testcases[0]

import random

def random_choice(items):
    """ yield list items in random order """
    items = items[:]  # preserve input argument
    random.shuffle(items)
    while items:
        yield items.pop()

pairs = set()
for event in random_choice(events):
    for index in random_choice(range(len(actors))):
        pair = (event, actors[index])
        if pair not in pairs:  # unique?
            pairs.add(pair)
            actors.pop(index)
            break

# Display the solution (in sorted order)
print 'Solution obtained has %d unique pairs: ' % len(pairs)
for item in sorted(list(pairs)):
    print item

I used ideas from both the answers to the question How can you select a random element from a list, and have it be removed?.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I ended up using a hybrid between this answer and @rbp that guaranteed the final list would match the length of the input list. –  rjf Apr 24 '12 at 23:14
    
@sail3005: I'd like to see the hybrid answer you came up with -- btw you can answer your own question on SO. I'd like to see how you guarantee the two lists have the same length because it seems to me that there are cases where that's impossible (as illustrated in the second and last [unreferenced] testcases in my answer). –  martineau Apr 25 '12 at 3:07
    
See update above. –  rjf Apr 25 '12 at 15:00
    
@sail3005: (Without going into too many details) there's a significant bug in the code in your update -- the pairs it generates are not unique -- which is why it may appear to you to be able to do the impossible. Apart from that, it also does not look to me like it would scale very well. –  martineau Apr 25 '12 at 22:28
    
Care to explain how...? The pairs might not be unique but a new pair can only be added to the resulting list if it isn't already present. –  rjf Apr 26 '12 at 3:28
show 2 more comments
# Create a list of actors and events for testing
events = ['P1','P1','P1','P2','P2','P2','P3','P3','P3','P4','P5','P6','P7','P7']
actors = ['IE','IE','ID','ID','IA','IA','IA','IC','IB','IF','IG','IH','IH','IA']

# Randomize the elements
shuffle(events)

# Merge the two lists into a new list of pairs
edgelist = zip(events,actors)

# remove duplicates
x = set(edgelist)

# If there were not enough unique elements : add new ones as needed.
while len(x)<len(edgelist):
    x.add((choice(events), choice(actor)))

# Display the solution
print 'Solution obtained: '
for item in x:
  print item
share|improve this answer
    
You are not consuming the actors or events,choice may pick them more o less times than listed. –  KurzedMetal Apr 24 '12 at 14:55
    
@dugres I like this updated solution. It's very simple and works fast enough for my purposes. Thanks. –  rjf Apr 27 '12 at 10:19
    
@sail3005 you do realise that 1) this may never end (same problem KurzedMetal mentioned), and 2) you could be re-using elements from events or actors that have already been consumed and should not be reused? –  rbp Apr 27 '12 at 11:08
    
@rbp Yes, I do now. I posted a new solution up top that seems to be working. –  rjf Apr 27 '12 at 19:13
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