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All, Could any one tell me a good way or tool to detect the memory leak in visual studio for these code? I have tested the crt debug, but while i abort the debug process(shift+f5), the memory leak report doesnot appear in the debug windows.

void fun1()
{
    int * pInt = new int;
    return;
}
void Execute(void)
{
    while(true)
    {
        cout<<"I will sleep for 1 second..."<<endl;
        ::Sleep(1000);
        fun1();
    }
    return;
}
int main()
{
    Execute();
    return 0;
}

Could any one know how to find the memory for above code? BTW, if i choose to use shared_ptr, the memory leak will not happen again, Right?

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4  
I'm waiting for answers telling you to delete pInt; because they haven't read the full question... –  Luchian Grigore Apr 24 '12 at 15:18
    
There's only one new statement so the memory leak shouldn't be hard to find :P –  nightcracker Apr 24 '12 at 15:19
    
How are you 'aborting the process'? It's likely that the CRT performs its checks during normal process shutdown - what happens if you change while (true) to a finite loop and just let the process exit? –  Steve Townsend Apr 24 '12 at 15:21
    
If you are going to abort the program forcefully mid-way no tool is going to give you any valid memory leak report. –  Alok Save Apr 24 '12 at 15:21
    
btw 2000ms != 1 second. Magic numbers bad karma. –  Steve Townsend Apr 24 '12 at 15:24

4 Answers 4

The problem here is fairly simple: when you abort a process, leaking memory is more or less taken for granted -- even if your code wouldn't normally leak, aborting it with the debugger is (short of extremely good luck) going to leak memory anyway. As such, most tools that would normally report memory leaks won't when you abort the program with the debugger.

As such, to see a leak report, you just about need to write code that will, at some point, exit on its own instead of requiring you to kill it with the debugger. If you change your code to something like this:

void fun1()
{
    int * pInt = new int;
    return;
}
void Execute(void)
{
    for (int i=0; i<100000; i++)
    {
        //cout<<"I will sleep for 1 second..."<<endl;
        //::Sleep(2000);
        fun1();
    }
    return;
}
int main()
{
    Execute();
    return 0;
}

By the way, when you pass 2000 as the parameter to Sleep, you should expect it to sleep at least 2 seconds, not just one. For the moment, I've commented out the cout and Sleep, so it should just quickly leak the memory and produce a leak report. With a lot of output and Sleeping, it would do the same, just a lot more slowly and noisily.

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I know from personal experience that Memory Validator will report such things as leaks. So it depends on the tools used. –  StarPilot May 25 '12 at 20:38

Does adding this to the top of your main function not work?

#if defined(DEBUG) | defined (_DEBUG)
    _CrtSetDbgFlag(_CRTDBG_ALLOC_MEM_DF | _CRTDBG_LEAK_CHECK_DF);
#endif

You have to run in debug mode.

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The problem is that while a process is running it is hard for an automated process to tell what memory was leaked. In languages that keep track of references to objects and memory blocks you can do this at any time, you just need to find the blocks that have no references. In C/C++ there is no such thing (unless you implement it yourself, that is), so you can't really tell if a memory block has been leaked or not.

One thing you can do in cases like this is to trigger the function that dumps memory leaks at a point in time in the life of your process that you know should not have any leaks. For example, let's say that you know that your application should not have any leaks at the end of each iteration in the Execute() while loop. Then you could do something like this:

#include <crtdbg.h>

void fun1()
{
    int * pInt = new int;
    return;
}
void Execute(void)
{
    int i = 0;
    while(true)
    {
        cout<<"I will sleep for 1 second..."<<endl;
        ::Sleep(2000);
        fun1();

        #ifdef _DEBUG
        // dump any leaks every 100 iterations
        if (++i % 100 == 0)
            _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks();
        #endif
    }
    return;
}
int main()
{
    Execute();
    return 0;
}

See this page for information about _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks() and other functions of the MSVC CRT library.

I hope this helps.

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I have no idea about VS, on Linux I'd use valgrind.

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3  
This is a question specifically about why the leak detection hooks in VS do not trigger here. –  Steve Townsend Apr 24 '12 at 15:23
    
Well, asking g**gle, I find this MSDN page Pay special attention to the comments section, explaining what you have to do for the C++ new. –  Michael Wild Apr 24 '12 at 15:26
    
The analogous page for VS2010 implies there is a separate #define for operator new –  Steve Townsend Apr 24 '12 at 15:53
    

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