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I have a class Item

class Item {
  public int count;
  public Item(int count) {
    this.count = count;
  }
}

Then, I will put a reference to Item in a field of other class

class Holder {
  public Item item;
  public Holder() {
    item = new Item(50);
  }
}

Can this new Item object be safely published? If not, why? According to Java Concurrency in Practice, the new Item is published without being fully constructed, but in my opinion the new Item is fully constructed: its this reference doesn't escape and the reference to it and its state is published at the same time, so the consumer thread will not see a stale value. Or is it the visibility problem. I don't exactly know the reason.

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class Item having Holder constructor?? –  Ketan Apr 24 '12 at 15:33
    
@SoftwareGuruji, I took the liberty to fix that :-) –  Péter Török Apr 24 '12 at 15:34
    
@PéterTörök I feel like ten of has has taken the same liberty at the same time :) You ran over some changes already :) –  Marko Topolnik Apr 24 '12 at 15:35
    
@MarkoTopolnik, join the party :-) I see someone even replaced the title, but you were faster to recover it :-) –  Péter Török Apr 24 '12 at 15:39
    
@PéterTörök Wow, what chaos :) It was me with the title, though. Three times the code sample got reverted to another type of garbage... –  Marko Topolnik Apr 24 '12 at 15:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Can this new Item object be safely published? If not, why?

The issue revolves around optimizations and reordering of instructions. When you have two threads that are using a constructed object without synchronization, it may happen that the compiler decides to reorder instructions for efficiency sake and allocate the memory space for an object and store its reference in the item field before it finishes with the constructor and the field initialization. Or it can reorder the memory synchronization so that other threads perceive it that way.

This is part of the Java language definition. Because there is no synchronization, the compiler may decide to do this because of optimizations. If you mark the field as final then the constructor is guaranteed to finish initialization as part of the constructor. Otherwise you will have to synchronize on a lock before using it.

Here's another couple references:

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Maybe I should read the java language specification , thank you! –  ohyeahchenzai Apr 24 '12 at 15:43
    
Let me point you straight to the correct chapter. It's a great read, much more than just dry specification. –  Marko Topolnik Apr 24 '12 at 15:46
    
Thanks @Marko. I've added that link into my answer. –  Gray Apr 24 '12 at 15:47
    
Oh , really thanks , I will read it right now , I can't wait for it !^_^.. –  ohyeahchenzai Apr 24 '12 at 15:49
    
For such a high-score answer: JVM decides to reorder instructions for efficiency sake and allocate the memory space for an object and store its reference in the item field before it finishes with the constructor and the field initialization. - this does not happen b/c the c-tor can throw an exception - hence in no shape or form the reference CAN be stored to speak before the c-tor finishes. While due to OOO and cache coherency (that's hardware level) the reference to the object state can be "made" visible to other threads prior to the fields (object state) –  bestsss Jul 2 '12 at 12:01

Yes, there is a visibility problem, as Holder.item is not final. So there is no guarantee that another thread will see its initialized value after the construction of Holder is finished.

And as @Gray pointed out, the JVM is free to reorder instructions in the absence of memory barriers (which can be created by a lock (synchronization), a final or volatile qualifier). Depending on the context, you must use one of these here to ensure safe publication.

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I think I may get the answer ,it is the reorder , but I don't the exactly order it may take ,but as Gray pointed it out , I know some about it , thank you both! –  ohyeahchenzai Apr 24 '12 at 15:48
    
@ohyeahchenzai If you carefully study the chapter if JLS mentioned in the other answer, it will all be clear to you. –  Marko Topolnik Apr 24 '12 at 15:49
    
Yet another good reason to favor immutability by making the fields final. –  Steve Kuo Apr 24 '12 at 15:50
    
@SteveKuo, indeed, if it is acceptable to the OP, final is the best solution. But since we don't know anything about the intended usage of the field, I listed the other options too. –  Péter Török Apr 24 '12 at 19:02
    
@PéterTörök,I haven't read the JLS , I read the Think In Java first , and then I think I should deep in some field , so I choose the JCIP , but I wasn't that clear with Java Memory Model , so I met some questions like this one ,thanks for your advice.^_^ –  ohyeahchenzai Apr 25 '12 at 13:39

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