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So I have a .cpp file with a Function which recieves a filename, and should return a String with the contents of the file (actualy modified contents, I modified the code to make it more understandable, but that doesn't have any effect on my problem). The problem is that f.good() is returning false and the loop, which reads the file is not working. CODE :

#include "StdAfx.h"
#include "Form21.h"
#include <string>
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>



    string ReadAndWrite(char* a){
    char filename[8];
    strcpy_s(filename,a);
    string output;
    char c;
    ifstream f(filename,ios::in);
    output+= "Example text"; // <-- this writes and returns just fine!
    c = f.get();

    while (f.good())
      { 

    output+= c;
    c= f.get();         
          }

    return output;
}

Does anyone have an idea on why this is happening? Does it have something to do with, that this is a seperate .cpp file( it doesnt even throw out an error when I remove #include <fstream>). Maybe there is a different kind of method to make the loop? I'll be very happy to hear any suggestions on how to fix this or maybe a different method on how to achieve my goal.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, there's really no reason to copy the file name you receive -- you can just use it as-is. Second, almost any loop of the form while (stream.good()), while (!stream.bad()), while (stream), etc., is nearly certain to be buggy. What you normally want to do is check whether reading some data worked.

Alternatively, you can skip using a loop at all. There are a couple of ways to do this. One that works nicely for shorter files looks like this:

string readfile(std::string const &filename) { 
    std::ifstream f(filename.c_str());   
    std::string retval;

    retval << f.rdbuf();
    return retval;
}

That works nicely up to a few tens of kilobytes (or so) of data, but starts to slow down on larger files. In such a case, you usually want to use ifstream::read to get the data, something along this general line:

std::string readfile(std::string const &filename) {
    std::ifstream f(filename.c_str());

    f.seekg(0, std::ios_base::end);
    size_t size = f.tellg();

    std::string retval(size, ' ');
    f.seekg(0);
    f.read(&retval[0], size);
    return retval;
}

Edit: If you need to process the individual characters (not just read them) you have a couple of choices. One is to separate it into phases, where you read all the data in one phase, and do the processing in a separate phase. Another possibility (if you just need to look at individual characters during processing) is to use something like std::transform to read data, do the processing, and put the output into a string:

struct character_processor { 
    char operator()(char input) { 
        // do some sort of processing on each character:
        return ~input;
    }
};

std::transform(std::istream_iterator<char>(f),
               std::istream_iterator<char>(),
               std::back_inserter(result),
               character_processor());
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See, the thing is that in the loop i actualy will need to analize each char, and change some chars to different ones, also i will add lines. Maby my mind is stuck to my method, but i am not sure if i am going to achieve what i want with your suggested method. –  krishkule Apr 24 '12 at 16:18
    
@krishkule: see edited answer. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 24 '12 at 16:35
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I would check that strlen(a) is not greater than 7... You might overrun filename and get a file name that doesn't exist.

Not relating the problem, I would re-write the function:

string ReadAndWrite(string a) {  // string here, if you are into C++ already
    string filename;  // also here
    filename = a;  // simpler
    string output;
    char c;
    ifstream f(filename.c_str());  // no need for ios::in (but needs a char *, not a string
    output+= "Example text"; // <-- this writes and returns just fine!
    f >> c;  // instead c = f.get();

    while (f) // no need for f.good())
      { 

        output+= c;
        f >> c; // again, instead c= f.get();         
      }

    return output;
}
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even if i change the 'filename' with a static "001.txt" which is the needed file name, it still doesnt work :/ –  krishkule Apr 24 '12 at 15:55
    
operator>> is not the same as get(). By default operator>> will drop all proceeding white space before performing the read into the variable. –  Loki Astari Apr 24 '12 at 16:03
    
This while(f) is just as bad as while(f.good()). In normal situations you would use neither. –  Loki Astari Apr 24 '12 at 16:09
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Might I suggest using fopen? http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/fopen/ It takes in a filename and returns a file pointer. With that you can use fgets to read the file line by line http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/fgets/

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2  
Please don't!!! :-) C++ streams are much more convenient and safer, auto-closing etc... That's the way to do it, but needed to know how to use them –  CodeChords man Apr 24 '12 at 15:48
    
alright then replace fgets with fseek –  Kaiser Wilhelm Apr 24 '12 at 15:53
1  
Please delete this answer before I down vote it. –  Loki Astari Apr 24 '12 at 16:11
    
whats wrong with it –  Kaiser Wilhelm Apr 24 '12 at 17:12
    
It's ok in C. But streams are superior. If you use fopen in C++ it means you don't expliot the language, and writing more vulnerable code. Like using goto or asm variable assignments in C. –  CodeChords man Apr 24 '12 at 18:43
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