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I would like to call a function of an extended class. How can this be done?

class Main{
    Function();
}

class Other extends Main{
    public void Function() { /* The function code */ }
}
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3  
Do you mean perhaps to call the super's method, i.e., super.Function()? Your question is quite vague and leaves out a lot of important detail. Can you clarify things so we don't have to guess? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 24 '12 at 16:05
    
Regarding your comment, You have it the other way around..I want the Main Class to call a function that was written in the Other Class.: No you don't, you never want this, as a parent class should never depend on the child class, ever. Rather than tell us how in code you're trying to solve this problem, tell us what overall problem you're trying to solve is. I suspect that inheritance isn't involved in the correct solution. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 24 '12 at 16:19

4 Answers 4

Class Main has no special privileges with regard to what is in Class Other that is not in Class Main. Also, a Main object is not necessarily an Other object. So you need to define the behavior when the an object of Class Main call Function(). You can either

  • Declare Function() to be abstract, meaning you cannot create an object of Class Main and class Other is forced to define Function() or be abstract itself, or
  • Declare a default implementation in Class Main that works for objects that are Mains and not Others.

Either way is acceptable depending on the situation. You have to give more details if you want help choosing which one is better in your situation.

Example:

class Main {
    public abstract void Function();    

    private void SomeFunction() {
        Function();
    }
}

class Other extends Main {
    public void Function() { /* code here */ }

}

or

class Main {
    public void function() { /* default code here, can be empty */ };    

    public void someFunction() {
        function();
    }
}

class Other extends Main {
    public void function() { /* code here */ }

}

class Example {
    public void example() {
        Main main = new Main();
        Other other = new Other();

        main.function(); // call the function defined in class Main
        other.function(); // call the function defined in class Other

        main.someFunction(); // call Main.someFunction, which calls Main.function
        other.someFunction(); // call Main.someFunction, which calls Other.function
    }
}
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I liked your second option, however Function() is not being altered by the extended class. –  user1042304 Apr 24 '12 at 16:36
    
@user1042304, you cannot have it both ways. Either you want to call a function that is defined in the extended class or you do not. If the extended class is not altering the function, then in what sense is it "a function of an extended class"? –  Old Pro Apr 24 '12 at 16:47
    
I do want to call the function created in the extended class. But your suggestion here is showing Function() as empty defined in the Main class, and then again defined in the Extended Class. –  user1042304 Apr 24 '12 at 17:07
    
@user1042304 I added an example for you. –  Old Pro Apr 24 '12 at 17:16
class Main {
    public void Function() { F2(); }

    public abstract void F2();
}

class Other extends Main {
    public void F2() { /* code here */ }
}
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You have it the other way around..I want the Main Class to call a function that was written in the Other Class. –  user1042304 Apr 24 '12 at 16:11
    
Updated according to your comments. –  Abdullah Jibaly Apr 24 '12 at 16:14
    
@user1042304: no you should never to this. Please see my comment to your original question. To get better help, tell us the details including the overall problem you're trying to solve, not how you're trying to solve it. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 24 '12 at 16:20
    
What's wrong with using an abstract function? –  Abdullah Jibaly Apr 24 '12 at 16:25
1  
Method, not variable. –  user1042304 Apr 24 '12 at 16:42
public class BaseCls {
    void function() {
        System.out.println("Base");
    }
}



public class ExtCls extends BaseCls {
void function() {
    super.function();
    System.out.println("ExtCls");
}

public static void main(String args[]) {
    new ExtCls().function();
    }
} 
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You can define Main as an abstract class, and define function() as an abstract method, implemented in the Other subclass. At some point you'll have to create an instance of Other, though.

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I used an instance of: Other instance = new Other(); And tried calling: Other.Function() back in the main class. It says that it is unable to find the function. I think I am misunderstanding how this works. I've done a lot of reading on it. Can you provide a little more feedback on how to accomplish this please? –  user1042304 Apr 24 '12 at 16:11
    
Could you provide the complete source? You should probably just be calling Function() in the main class, rather than Other.Function(), since Main has the Function method itself -- it's just being implemented by Other. –  Louis Wasserman Apr 24 '12 at 16:12

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