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Is it ok to invoke a returned function that is creating a closure like in my code below?

So that when gaining access to the html I do not have to do a Bay.HTML()(); ?

Bay.prototype.HTML = function () {
    var html;
    return function () {
        if (!html) {
            var td = docCreate('td');
            td.setAttribute('id', 'bay' + this.number);
            td.setAttribute('class', 'bay');
            html = td;
        }
        return html;
    }(); <----------HERE
};
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What do you mean "is it ok"? –  Zirak Apr 24 '12 at 16:23
1  
This looks "OK" but over complicated in my opinion. Why not simply attach html to the Bay instance (whith this.html) and drop the internal closure and a lot of code ? –  dystroy Apr 24 '12 at 16:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I guess you wanted

Bay.prototype.HTML = (function () {
    var html;
    return function () {
        if (!html) {
            var td = docCreate('td');
            td.setAttribute('id', 'bay' + this.number);
            td.setAttribute('class', 'bay');
            html = td;
        }
        return html;
    };
})(); <----------HERE

This assigns the function which is returned from the closure to Bay.prototype.HTML, instead of executing a useless function instantly every time Bay.prototype.HTML is invoked - not really creating a closure.

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After i posted that I realized that what I was looking for was a way to assign the html variable once, and on every call afterwards the data is just pulled from the html variable so the function does not run. Really, what i was after was to keep from doing a this._html property and then having a prototype.HTML function, which seemed a little overkill. –  Vinyl Windows Apr 24 '12 at 18:14

It's ok but it's not any different to

Bay.prototype.HTML = function () {
    var html;

    if (!html) {
        var td = docCreate('td');
        td.setAttribute('id', 'bay' + this.number);
        td.setAttribute('class', 'bay');
        html = td;
    }
    return html;
};

That mean's your html is not cached.

If you want to cache html then you want:

Bay.prototype.HTML = function () {

    if (!this.html) {
        var td = docCreate('td');
        td.setAttribute('id', 'bay' + this.number);
        td.setAttribute('class', 'bay');
        this.html = td;
    }
    return this.html;
};
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It depends on the context in which you want something to be "ok". Does it work? If so, sometimes that's all that's needed. Is it clear to someone else reading your code as to what it does, is it maintainable, is it safe?

So, the code. Does it work? No.

The method variable 'html' will be initialized to null everytime this prototype function is called, so the conditional in your interior function will always evaluate to true, and go through the steps of setting up the dom elements.

Is it necessary to use a closure here? No.

You are creating a closure that won't persist beyond the calling context, and is therefore useless. Every time you call Bar.HTML(), you will be creating and destroying an extra context just to execute some code, since you aren't storing or returning a reference to the closure itself to be acted upon later. You could just factor the closure out, and get better performing results:

Bay.prototype.HTML = function() {
    var html; 
    if(!html) {
        var td = docCreate('td');
        td.setAttribute('id', 'bay' + this.number);
        td.setAttribute('class', 'bay');
        html = td;
    }
    return html;
}

Of course, with that html var being declared right there, the if statement isn't necessary, but I assume this is just some sample code.

Here's some great info on closures in javascript, when and how to use them.

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@Esailija is right. Your implementation isn't caching the results like you want.

His solution will cache it, but it will be a public property. If you want a caching version that doesn't make the cache public, you're evaluating the wrong function. What you want is:

Bay.prototype.HTML = (function() {
    var html;
    return function() {
        if(!html) {
            var td = docCreate('td');
            td.setAttribute('id', 'bay' + this.number);
            td.setAttribute('class', 'bay');
            html = td;
        }
        return html;
    };
})();
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Thank you very much! this is exactly what I was looking for. Along with the explanation/ verification.. So, is the cashing version similar to a closure? –  Vinyl Windows Apr 24 '12 at 18:24
    
It is a closure. The evaluated anonymous function on the outside creates a scope for the returned inner function that is closed to everything except said inner function. What was being done before wasn't really a closure because the outer scope "died" at the end of the function call. –  David Ellis Apr 24 '12 at 19:18
    
Another thing i just noticed is that I was thinking that the .HTML property of Bay was acting as a var, as if I created a closure and stuffed it into a var html. But really every time .HTML() was called it was overwriting. I am not sure if it is possible to have a cashed value with-in a function that can have multiple instances.? –  Vinyl Windows Apr 24 '12 at 21:22

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