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I am trying to iterate through the variables set in a python script. I cam across the following:

Enumerate or list all variables in a program of [your favorite language here]

and in the first example:

#!/us/bin/python                                                                                    

foo1 = "Hello world"
foo2 = "bar"
foo3 = {"1":"a", "2":"b"}
foo4 = "1+1"

for name in dir():
    myvalue = eval(name)
    print name, "is", type(name), "and is equal to ", myvalue

It lists all the variables stored in memory. I want to isolate the variables I have created in my script and not list the system variables created by default. Is there any way to do this?

Thanks, Mike

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3 Answers 3

You can strip out variables that are included in your module by default by checking if they are in the builtin __builtins__ module, like this:

>>> x = 3
>>> set(dir()) - set(dir(__builtins__))
set(['__builtins__', 'x'])

The only thing this doesn't strip out is __builtins__ itself, which is easy to special case.

Also note that this won't work if you have re-defined any builtin names. You shouldn't do this in practice, but a lot of people do, many by accident.

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dir() doesn't give the names in __builtins__ for me (Python 2.7). All I get is ['__builtins__', '__doc__', '__name__', '__package__']. –  interjay Apr 24 '12 at 16:47
    
@interjay it gives some other things though, like __doc__ and __name__ that I think OP wants stripped out –  jterrace Apr 24 '12 at 16:48
    
But that has nothing to do with __builtins__, they are just names which are defined in every module (and therefore happen to be in __builtins__ as well). Calling them "builtin variables" is misleading. –  interjay Apr 24 '12 at 16:53
    
That's true, I edited the language a bit –  jterrace Apr 24 '12 at 16:54

If you don't put any underscores in front of your variables you could do:

#!/us/bin/python                                                                                    

foo1 = "Hello world"
foo2 = "bar"
foo3 = {"1":"a", "2":"b"}
foo4 = "1+1"

for name in dir():
    if not name.startswith('__'):
        myvalue = eval(name)
        print name, "is", type(myvalue), "and is equal to ", myvalue
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Here is solution.

#!/us/bin/python    

not_my_data = set(dir())

foo1 = "Hello world"
foo2 = "bar"
foo3 = {"1":"a", "2":"b"}
foo4 = "1+1"

my_data = set(dir()) - not_my_data

for name in my_data :
    myvalue = eval(name)
    print name, "is", type(name), "and is equal to ", myvalue

but this is bad practice.

You should use something like

#!/us/bin/python    
my_data = dict()                                                                                   
my_data['foo1'] = "Hello world"
my_data['foo2'] = "bar"
my_data['foo1'] = {"1":"a", "2":"b"}
my_data['foo1'] = "1+1"

for name in my_data :
    myvalue = eval(my_data[name])
    print name, "is", type(name), "and is equal to ", myvalue
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